Your 2017 SIG Chairs

Between December 1st – 15th we held the second annual SIG Chair elections. The voter turn out was impressive, which shows that our SIGs are an important part of the MCN community. Strong SIGs foster discussion and collaboration among colleagues and this is at the heart of what MCN does.

Not part of a SIG? Want to be? Click on the links below and you’ll find a sign up form on each SIG’s page, you can join as many SIGs as you like!

 

Digital Asset Management

  • Chair: Susan Wamsley, Digital Asset Manager, The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum

image015I have worked for over ten years in the field of digital asset management setting up DAM systems from analog photography libraries for global companies. In my current role, I work closely with all museum departments to facilitate digital media asset submissions into the museum DAM system. Following the museum’s archival and metadata standards, I ensure the integrity and reliability of the information in the system and provide support to all users. I also research and provide recommendations on best practices for software, asset preservation and digital rights management. I have encountered and solved many implementation, workflow and user adoption issues over the years and am excited to share my knowledge.

  • Vice Chair: Jennifer Sellar, Senior Digital Image Archivist, The Museum of Modern Art

Jennifer Sellar headshotJennifer Sellar began her archiving career at Ole Miss working with a large collection of Southern photography and home movies. At the Museum of Modern Art, she was hired to organize the Imaging Studio’s archive and create an archival workflow for the department’s photographers. When she arrived the archive was still stored on CDs and searchable only through an enormous Excel spreadsheet. Since the launch of MoMA’s DAM in 2008, she has overseen day to day front end operations and works across various departments throughout the museum to create metadata/taxonomy structures and create guidelines for the museum’s quickly expanding digital trove of images, video, audio, and related materials.

 

Digital Imaging

  • Chair: Dan Dennehy, Senior Photographer and Head of Visual Resources, Minneapolis Institute of Art

image032As Senior Photographer and Head of Visual Resources at Minneapolis Institute of Art, I lead a department responsible for collection imaging, digital asset management and image rights issues. As a member of Mia’s Media and Technology Division, I have the pleasure of working with a creative team of makers and developers dedicated to finding the most innovative ways of bringing our collections and communities together. It has never been a more exciting time to be involved with art and imaging, as new computational techniques revolutionize our practice. I would be honored to help lead the efforts of MCN’s Digital Media SIG in facilitating dialogue around our current and future challenges.

  • Vice Chair: Kurt Heumiller, Senior Imaging Systems Specialist, Yale Center for British Art

image030Since 2008, Kurt Heumiller has worked in the Imaging Systems and Intellectual Property department at the Yale Center for British Art in New Haven, CT. He currently serves as the Senior Imaging Systems specialist where his areas of focus include imaging workflows, color management, and digital asset management. He also has an interest in emerging technologies such as Reflectance Transform Imaging, 3D imaging and printing, and VR sysstems. In addition to MCN, he is also a member of the ImageMuse museum imaging group.

 

 

Strategy

  • Chair: Brad Dunn, Web and Digital Communications Director, The Field Museum

Brad Dunn headshotBrad is the Web and Digital Communications Director for The Field Museum in Chicago, overseeing web and mobile experiences, and storytelling in social media and science filmmaking. His experience blends his time in interactive, games, social media and experiential design, stage directing, filmmaking and advertising. He has crafted user- and story-driven multichannel engagements across digital devices and real world spaces for exuberant live audiences, smartphone wielding consumers, smiling children, intoxicated cruise ship passengers, and upper eastside arts funders. The common thread is his desire to tell stories and create experiences that inspire and encourage human connection and personal discovery.

  • Vice Chair: Mark McKay, Director of Digital, Art Gallery of Ontario

Mark McKay headshotMark leads a 10 person division made up of 3 departments. Responsible for developing and executing an action plan in support of the AGO’s Technology Strategy. Google Analytics and Adwords certified content marketer. 12 years experience creating branded content and more than 7 years leading corporate digital and social media strategy. Trained in Project Management and Business Analysis. Eleven years of experience in the entertainment industry. Hands on advanced production knowledge of web development, design, video, and animation set me apart from my peers.

 

Educational & Interpretive Media

  • Chair: Emily Fry, Director of Interpretation, Art Institute of Chicago
  • image020Emily Fry has been a proud member of MCN since 2009 and served as the Education and Interpretive SIG co-chair in 2016. She is currently the Director of Interpretation at the Art Institute of Chicago where she leads the museum’s efforts to increase the overall accessibility of the collection, empowering audiences to make meaningful connections between artworks across time and in their lives. She’s interested in continuing to strengthen our community of practice for those working within the cross-section of digital media and audience engagement. Emily wants to create a dialogic space for Education and Interpretive Media SIG members to continually support one another, offer advice, develop workshops and address relevant topics that impact ourselves and the audiences we serve.
  • Vice Chair: Jennifer Foley, Director of Education and Community Engagement, Albright-Knox Art Gallery

image018Jennifer Foley is the Director of Education and Community Engagement at the Albright-Knox Art Gallery in Buffalo, NY. In this role she oversees all of the museum’s educational programs, as well as the development of educational and interpretive media content, including audio tours, exhibition media, and the museum’s artist interview series, Outspoken. Prior to coming the A-K she was the Director of Interpretation at the Cleveland Museum of Art, where she worked on numerous media projects, including content development for the museum’s collection app, ArtLens. She has been attending MCN since 2011, and signed on for a two year term as one of the program co-chairs for MCN2016 in New Orleans and MCN2017 in Pittsburgh.

 

Information Technology

  • Chair: Janice Craddock, Director of Information Technology, Amon Carter Museum of American Art

image010As Director of Information Technology, Janice heads a department of three to provide technical support for about 120 staff. In her thirty years at the Amon Carter Museum of American Art, she has seen firsthand how technology has changed, evolving into an increasingly vital role supporting the institutional mission—a change she has also witnessed during her twenty years involved with MCN. As IT SIG chair, Janice’s aim is to support new IT professionals and engage those with more experience in ongoing conversations about the fundamentals of IT operations and emerging technologies.

  • Vice Chair: Brian Dawson, Chief Digital Officer, Canada Science and Technology Museums Corporation

image012Brian is the Chief Digital Officer at the Canada Science and Technology Museums Corporation, which also operates the Canada Aviation and Space Museum and the Canada Agriculture and Food Museum.  As CDO, Brian drives the development and implementation of the strategy for digital platforms, content, distribution and engagement throughout the organization, leading a team of information technology, digital media and exhibition specialists. Prior to joining the museum, Brian worked at Nortel Networks in telephony software development and process improvement. Brian holds a Bachelor of Computer Science from the Dalhousie University (Technical University of Nova Scotia) and a Bachelor of Business Administration from the University of Cape Breton. Brian is keen to help keep connections alive and conversations going through the year, with a regular rhythm of topic discussions, leverage tools such as the Basecamp platform more fully, and sounding out the SIG on additional ideas.

 

Intellectual Property 

  • Chair: Melissa Gold Fournier, Manager Imaging services and IP, Yale Center for British Art

image004At the Yale Center for British Art, Melissa oversees digital imaging, manages the Center’s intellectual property and rights-related collection information, and serves as the lead for the Center’s participation in Yale’s shared digital asset management system.  Melissa served as the convener of Yale University’s Open Access Implementation Working Group and oversees the online release of the Center’s open images.  A museum collection professional since 1998, Melissa was grateful to find in MCN a superb resource for discussion and education around digitization and intellectual property.  She has volunteered for MCN in various capacities since attending her first conference in Boston in 2005. Working with the IP SIG, Melissa wishes to help MCN continue to provide these opportunities to others.

  • Vice Chair: John ffrench, Director of Visual Resources, Yale University Art Gallery

image002John oversees workflow, design, color management and long-term archiving of images and image data and supervises the creation, quality control, asset management, distribution of and rights related to images of works of art for publication, study, documentation, educational programs, promotion and other uses. He has been actively involved in the development of the YUAG/Yale Campus DAM and the creation of Yale University’s Open Access policy. He also oversees the rights and reproductions staff responsible for clearing rights for internal publications and publicity campaigns at YUAG. On campus he founded and leads the Digital Coffee Group, a campus-wide organization established to create core standards, develop resources and provide guidance and support for digital imaging related technology, projects and professionals on campus. I am interested in working with the IP-SIG as I feel I have a sense of how these issues touch all of our work in museums.

 

Media Production & Branding

  • Chair: Mandy Kritzeck, Digital Media Producer & Project Manager, The Corning Museum of Glass

Mandy Kritzeck headshotMandy Kritzeck is the Digital Media Producer and Project Manager at The Corning Museum of Glass. Working with an in-house digital media production team, she produces over 150 videos a year for both internal and external audiences including artist profiles, live-streamed demonstrations, lectures, conservation case studies, marketing videos, and docent trainings. Mandy manages the museum’s popular YouTube channel, www.youtube.com/corningmuseumofglass, which shares a mix of informational glass how-to demos and interviews with artists who work in glass. She has contributed to many digital media projects at the Corning Museum including the GlassApp web app, GlassLab web app and Pyrex Potluck website. She received an M.A. in History Museum Studies from The Cooperstown Graduate Program and a B.A. in American History, Museum Studies and Documentary Journalism from the University of Minnesota. Her prior experience includes the Minnesota Historical Society and the Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media. Find her on Twitter at @mkritzeck.

 

Data & Insights

  • Chair: Elena Villaespesa, Digital Analyst, The Metropolitan Museum of Art

image027As Digital Analyst at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, Elena is responsible for establishing and overseeing an analytics program to monitor and assess departmental channels, platforms, and programs. She conducts user research, and develops timely reports to understand the fluctuations in data and identify trends and opportunities to optimize the museum’s digital platforms and programs. Previously she worked during five years as Digital Analyst at Tate (London) producing website, mobile and social media metrics reports and coordinating surveys, to inform decision making with the aim of improving user journeys across different digital platforms. Elena is also a PhD student at the School of Museum Studies, University of Leicester and a Tate Honorary Research Fellow 15-17. Her research is about how museums can measure the impact and value of their social media activities. There is increasing need for data literacy in the museum sector. I envision the Data & Insights SIG as an active community of practice to share information and discuss experiences. I believe the DI SIG should support museum professionals in the implementation and management of data analytics creating resources and defining best practices.

  • Vice Chair: Trilce Navarette, Researcher at University of Southern Denmark / Guest researcher at University of Amsterdam

image025

Trilce Navarrete is researcher with interest in the historic and economic aspects of digital heritage. My research is driven by an interest to support understanding of the role of digital heritage in our lives and to increase efficiency, equity and effectiveness in the (re)use of heritage knowledge. I have actively participated in international communities as speaker, researcher, and organizer. I regularly present at different universities, at conferences and academic meetings, generally around the subjects of heritage, digital, policy and cultural economics. From my passion and knowledge of museums as well as my curiosity , I started researching the adoption of computers at work in 1999. An important source of inspiration has been the spark of (sharing) knowledge across generations. Not surprisingly, my research has made me a great fan of MCN for its international role in advocating for and advancing the specialized work needed to best manage collections information and improve communication inside and outside the museum. I envision the DI-SIG as core group to support raise awareness, familiarity and know how of the power of data.

 

Social Media

  • Chair: Meagan Estep, Social Media Manager, National Gallery of Art (DC)

Meagan estep headshot 2016Meagan Estep is an educator who believes deeply in the power of online tools to create conversation. Meagan is social media manager at the National Gallery of Art, where she creates participatory experiences using a variety of platforms. Actively participating with MCN since 2012, she also contributes to the National Art Education Association (museum education division) and Museums and the Web. Meagan’s idea of co-leading MCN’s social media SIG would build on current momentum. This means facilitating an atmosphere of mentorship, allowing us to shape strong relationships with colleagues. The best moments are the ones where we learn from each other. With Meagan, our SIG would be a space for learning new and expansive ideas, ultimately provoking intentional, relevant conversations.

  • Vice Chair: Amy Fox, Digital and Social Media Content Specialist, Smithsonian American Art Museum & Renwick Gallery

image042Amy Fox is the Digital and Social Media Content Specialist at the Smithsonian American Art Museum and the Renwick Gallery, where she manages the social media channels and online communities. She is passionate about social engagement and connecting online audiences with museums. She is interested in the intersection of technology, conversation, learning, entertainment, innovation, and people. With this SIG, Amy hopes to connect social media professionals from across the field to support and learn from each other—bringing together community managers, content creators, producers, marketers, educators, and technologists to solve problems and share insight.

 

 

Small Museum

  • Chair: Lisa Worley, Director of Material Culture, Historic Ford Estates

image005Lisa (@goodlisa) develops programming to connect youth to Texas history. She also consults for historic sites on interpretive planning and collections issues. Lisa is co-chair of the Austin Museum Partnership and is an active member of Texas Association of Museums where she leads an effort to publish a new edition of The Museum Forms Book. She has worked for small museums for the majority of her career and believes their work is enormously important and vital. Lisa holds a MA in Public History (Colorado State University), and a BA in History (University of Arizona). In her free time, she reads, drinks beer, and is learning to sew.

  • Vice Chair: Don Erwin, Niagara Aerospace Museum

image008Don has been in various IT roles for over 23 years in DoD, NASA, and Higher Education from developer and tester to project and service management. I’ve served as CIO at a 4-year college in the State University of New York (SUNY) system and am currently Chief Service Manager for a SUNY IT managed services provider.  I’ve volunteered at several museums over the past 18 years, helping with their web and other IT needs.  I currently volunteer for the Niagara Aerospace Museum. I hope to leverage my experience in the SUNY system, where I’ve been involved in sharing best practices, experiences, and even resources among campuses.  I would like to facilitate discussion within the SIG to identify areas for collaboration.

0

Pronoun stickers at MCN 2016

Guest post by Nikhil Trivedi

Nikhil Trivedi delivers his MCN 2015 Ignite talk

At MCN this year we had pronoun stickers (along with lots of other fun stickers!) that attendees could optionally add to their name badges. I’d like to share some background of this sort of thing at conferences, what sort of thinking went around our stickers, and how I had them printed.

Some background

In recent years there’s been a growing number of conferences that have allowed attendees to identify their pronouns with each other is some formalized way. What’s being challenged here is the notion that the ways we may perceive each other’s genders doesn’t always match our gender identities and the pronouns we use.

I’ve seen some conferences ask for people’s pronouns during registration and print them on attendees’ name badges. Others have had pins that say “Ask me for my pronouns!” to encourage attendees to have conversations about their pronouns.

Some people appreciate the opportunity to identify their pronouns in spaces that don’t often encourage that. Some folks don’t want to feel like they’re being forced to out themselves to a room full strangers. And other folks feel all sorts of ways that I haven’t yet learned about. All these feelings and criticisms are totally valid.

The stickers at MCN

So as conference organizers, how do we do navigate all these concerns and implement a system for our group of attendees, specifically?

I’m connected when a network of radical tech workers via a conference called AlterConf. I went to them for some guidance on how to make gender identification easier for folks who wish to share it, but it’s really complicated. As I mentioned above, for some, pronouns can be a really personal thing to share with a room full of 618 other people they don’t really know. For others, they want the opportunity to put it out there. In hindsight, I see that ultimately the best way to do this would have been to ask attendees who don’t conform to the gender binary what they want for their conference experience, and to have done that. With a little more foresight, we could have done that. If the stickers didn’t sit right with any of the attendees, I’d love to hear your feedback and criticisms. So please do reach out to me!

As a cisgendered man, I recognize that I may not have been the best person to have made the final decisions about how to implement a mechanism like this. I do know that we have had trans people in our community in the past, and we have lost some of those folk due to awful, tragic circumstances. I think about that when I’m planning my sessions and participating in the program committee. What would they have wanted? What can we do to support trans first-timers and old-timers to feel welcome at MCN, and how can we support cis attendees in being thoughtful about our trans attendees?

Here are some of the things I thought about when deciding if and how to make the stickers. All this stuff came out of my conversations with folks through AlterConf:

  • They shouldn’t be mandatory. If folks want to share their pronouns with other attendees, great! If they prefer not to specify their pronouns, that’s great, too! I thought it was important to make it clear to all attendees that the stickers were totally optional for all people.
  • People should be able to choose multiple pronouns. Some folks use multiple pronouns and appreciate when people mix it up.
  • The options shouldn’t be limited. Gender is a spectrum, and there are many, many ways people identify, and people use any number of pronouns to represent that.
  • They should be easy to read at a quick glance or for someone who is visually impaired.
  • They should be fun and colorful. And I didn’t want them to conform to traditionally gendered colors (blue and pink). Because people who all use a same pronoun can think, act, and be totally different from each other.

In the end, clearly optional, easy to read stickers were the best option.

How I made them

While I was chatting with AlterConf friends, someone went ahead and designed the stickers that we ended up using at MCN! Amazing!

Pronoun stickers in use at MCN 2016

I used the Sticker Book on moo.com and chose the option where I could upload my own artwork. Here are the final images I used to print. And here are the source files, in case you want to make any changes. Moo.com let you lay out the stickers in a way where you can order more of some stickers than others, so adjust the quantities as you see fit. It’s super cheap, it comes out to about $10 for every 90 stickers you order.

At the conference we placed the stickers down at the registration desk with a sign stating clearly that all stickers were totally optional for all people. And we laid them out with other fun stickers, too–like cats in chef’s hats! Unicorns! Pigs making snowpeople!

Here’s what Justine Arreche (@saltinejustine), the designer, had to say about the stickers:

“When I saw the discussion regarding pronoun stickers I was excited. I thought it was such a great idea and was I surprised I hadn’t seen anything like that before. After a quick Google search with limited results I decided to create my own set of pronoun stickers for people to use. I wanted the design to be respectful yet still fun enough for attendees to want to put the stickers on their badges or shirts. The colors were carefully chosen to avoid gendered colors while also preserving readability for those with any visual impairments. After sharing a screen shot of the designs on Twitter my mentions were inundated with people requesting how they could print them for their events. I quickly created a public Dropbox folder with a variety of file types allowing people to have them printed locally or online. Additionally I included the live files so there was the ability to change the designs as their needs required.”

I was excited to provide the stickers at MCN 2016. I’d love to hear what you thought about them, how they may have changed your conference experience, and any feedback or criticism you might have. Please reach out to me on Twitter and let me know!

0

Call for MCN Program Co-Chair 2017 & 2018

Post it notes with MCN 2016 session proposals written on them.

MCN Program Co-Chair 2017 & 2018

Position Title: Program Co-Chair

Period: 2 years

Start: Mid-December 2016

Commitment: 2-5 hours/week throughout the year, increasing as the conference nears; full time during the conference. Available one weekend in February/March for a site visit to that year’s conference location (paid for by MCN).

Compensation: Program Co-Chair is a volunteer role and is therefore not compensated. MCN does however offer complimentary registration to the annual conference during the year(s) you serve.

Location: MCN’s Annual Conference is a North American based-conference that supports global involvement and has an emerging international following. The successful candidate is required to attend the Conference in person, as well as participate in regular phone or online meetings.
MCN2017 will take place in Pittsburgh, November 7–10, 2017.

Deadline: January 15th

 

Description

MCN is looking for one thoughtful, motivated and dynamic museum professionals to join us as MCN Program Co-Chair. This is an opportunity to help shape the future of a major museum technology conference, immerse yourself in cutting edge developments in the sector, broaden your networks on a national level, and to gain experience and professional development in event programming.

The Program Co-Chair provides leadership for the annual MCN Conference, creating the program through the conception and organization of panels, presentations, paper sessions, readings, performances, exhibitions, installations, workshops, and special events. With current Co-Chairs Jennifer Foley and Trish Oxford, the newly appointed Co-Chair will work together to develop an innovative and experiential conference program that serves the evolving needs of the MCN community as it celebrates its 50th anniversary in 2017, and then assume the lead Co-Chair role for the 2018 conference.

The ideal candidate will be passionate about the intersection of museums and technology, and interested in developing an innovative conference program, ideally having attended MCN at least twice in the previous five years, and with one of those years being 2016 (preferred) or 2015. They will have existing networks within the sector, and a strong understanding of the issues facing museums with regards to technology. They will be active in the museum or cultural technology community (museums, archives, libraries, etc.) and knowledgeable of trusted sources of information; a proactive self-starter; have excellent oral and written communication skills; be a creative, big thinker; and be diplomatic under pressure.

About MCN
MCN is a nonprofit organization whose core purpose is to foster innovation and excellence by supporting professionals who seek to transform the way their cultural organizations reach, engage, and educate their audiences using digital technologies. We do this by building a community that attracts, nurtures, inspires and sustains exceptional professionals. Learn more.

For further information and a full overview of responsibilities, email program@mcn.edu.

To apply, please send an email articulating why you think you’d be a good fit for this position, and noting any relevant experience to: jobs@mcn.edu. Please include a CV or link to your LinkedIn profile.

0

My first MCN event, not my last!

Guest post by MCN 2016 Scholar, Andrea Ledesma

MCN 2016 attendees take part in Ignite at the House of Blues, New Orleans

I’d have been crazy to turn down a week in New Orleans. And, when that week promises days filled with talks of museums, tech, and a little karaoke…well, I packed my bags as early as June.

This November, I attended MCN 2016 as an MCN Scholar. I didn’t know what to expect. Admittedly, I was a little nervous, hanging with museum professionals, many of whom I admired on Twitter, in blogs, and other niches of the Internet.  

MCN 2016 was all about the “human-centered museum.” This theme inspired an array of presentations, from web design to oral history, apps to activism. I attended as many as I could, and looking back I found myself returning to a number of my own central questions.

First, who is the human at the center of this museum? We threw around a lot of names during the week:


30191898703_60df804abe_z
Visitors

Participants

Users

Collaborators

Citizens

Superheroes

Friends

 

These categories are not mutually exclusive, nor are they restricted to folks outside the museum. We and our publics embody each, and this changes our expectations of and responsibilities to the museum. What I learned from the conference is that discerning between each is a matter of empathy. We need to ask ourselves how we see each other and ourselves in the museum and the community at large.

Second, what makes data meaningful? David Newburry’s ignite talk had me cheering for linked open data in the middle of the House of Blues. Brian Alpert, Sarah Banks, and Effie Kapsalis from the Smithsonian gave me a crash course in user metrics. I even got really excited metadata (though, I’ve always been a fan). With Andrea Wallace I embraced the public domain as the space in which we “let our imagination run wild.” Good data, at the very least, is clean and accessible, growing and stable, transparent and interpretive.

Finally, what does it mean to be a cultural worker in the digital age? I’m currently pursuing an MA in Public Humanities. I focus on the use of technology in museums and cultural institutions, with an emphasis on new media theory and public history. I’m also graduating in May. So, this conference was as much about creative exploration as it was professional development. I appreciated not only the sessions like speed networking but also the honest conversations about labor. Elissa Frankle talked about “radical trust.” While we talk about trusting publics, centering their perspectives and insight when (co)creating content, designing experiences, etc., institutions must also apply this principle within. How can we recognize and nurture the talent of our colleagues? How can create we culture of risk (without blame or fear of reproach) that ultimately makes for better, more exciting work?

I’m still coming down from my MCN 2016 high, finding myself craving another beignet and reminded of conference panels in the middle of class. Thank you to the MCN Scholarship Committee for this amazing experience.

This was my first MCN event, but it surely won’t be my last.

0

2016 SIG Chair Elections

MCN_SIG_RGB

Hello fellow MCNers,

It’s that time of year again. From December 1-15, 2016, we invite you to vote in the second annual election of our Special Interest Group (SIG) Chairs. Please take a moment to review the slate of candidates and vote for the leadership of SIGs you are most interested in.

The roles of SIG Chair and SIG Vice Chair are volunteer positions and the candidates are self-nominated. I would like to thank the 2016 SIG chairs for all their hard work and the nominees who have put themselves forward this year to help our organization.  I encourage those of you who may be interested in SIG leadership roles to keep this opportunity in mind for coming years.

Please cast your vote now and help support the leadership and future direction of our community.  If you are interested in learning about other opportunities to get involved in MCN check out the professional development webpage (link) for more information or email profdev@mcn.edu.

All the best,

BethBollwerk

Elizabeth Bollwerk
MCN Board member

0