Archive for 2018

Meet your 2019 SIG Chairs!

Thank you for participating in the 2018 Annual SIG Chairs Elections. Join me in congratulating each one of our SIG Chairs.

Eric Longo, Executive Director


Data & Insights SIG

Chair: Angie Judge, CEO, Dexibit

A kiwi technology entrepreneur with a background in computer science, Angie leads an award winning team at Dexibit, the company she founded to transform decision making in the arts. Named the 2018 Woman of Influence for Business Enterprise, Angie developed her passion for analytics in the telecoms industry with over 10 years in a corporate career as an Analyst at Hewlett Packard and Israeli software company Amdocs. Prior, she started her career in marketing for a merchant bank across a portfolio of brands.

Angie is also the Chair of the American Alliance of Museum’s Technology Board and host of a tourism analytics think tank network across the US. In her spare time, Angie mentors young women into technology careers, lecturers in data science and is a keen water skier.

Co-Chair: Keith Laba, Chief Information & Analytics Officer, Arizona Science Center

Keith Laba joined Arizona Science Center as their Chief Information & Analytics Officer (CIAO) in March of 2017. With a Bachelor’s degree in Mathematics and a Master’s degree in Optimization and Applied Mathematics from The College of William and Mary, Keith has been delivering advanced analytics solutions and developing data-informed strategies for over 20 years. He has experience with a wide range of organizations, in areas such as financial services, travel, and post-secondary education. In his current role, Keith leads a technology and analytics team that collaborates with departments across the entire organization, to establish a data-informed culture and help transform Arizona Science Center into a global leader through research, technology, advanced analytics, and strategic insight.

Digital Asset Management SIG

Chair: Susan Wamsley, Digital Asset Manager, The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum

I have worked for over ten years in the field of digital asset management setting up DAM systems from analog photography libraries for global companies. In my current role, I work closely with all museum departments to facilitate digital media asset submissions into the museum DAM system. Following the museum’s archival and metadata standards, I ensure the integrity and reliability of the information in the system and provide support to all users. I also research and provide recommendations on best practices for software, asset preservation and digital rights management. I have encountered and solved many implementation, workflow and user adoption issues over the years and am excited to share my knowledge.

Co-Chair: David Garfinkel, Senior Digital Asset Manager Technician, The Metropolitan Museum of Art

I grew up in Knoxville, Tennessee and my dad thought that someday I’d like to be a computer programmer, so he bought the family an early Macintosh. Turns out I liked MacDraw better than programming, but somehow twenty or so years later I found my first full-time job doing Mac Support work for Penguin Books. Seems I liked fixing computers and that started my career. After leaving IT for a couple of years do get a graduate degree from Teachers College I worked at a small private high school in Manhattan, where wrote a grant for, and ended up starting a program in Media Arts designed for students to use digital video and audio equipment as tools for learning within individual and group projects. In 2003 I left the high school and took a job doing IT consulting work at MoMA and in 2006 I was asked to take the lead on the DAM project at the Museum of Modern Art. At the time I didn’t know what Digital Asset Management was, but with some help, a good team and some stumbles along the way, we managed to choose a vendor, create a plan and eventually set up a speedy and stable system. In 2018 I left MoMA to take a job doing DAMS work at The MET. I work on NetX, processing engines, Jira, Jira Service Desk and Confluence and the challenges and learning opportunities at the new position are many. We are working on 3D ingest and preservation, film archiving and restoration, agile processes for project management and other larger initiatives.

Digital Imaging SIG

Chair: Ben Cort, Collections Photographer, Portland Art Museum

Ben Cort graduated from Rochester Institute of Technology in 2011 with a degree in Professional Photographic Illustration and a minor in Imaging Systems. Upon moving to Portland Oregon that May, he began working as a freelance digital tech/lighting assistant in the commercial and advertising photography markets. He also began working at the Portland Art Museum where he was tasked with constructing and implementing an in-house digital photo studio, with associated workflows, processes and procedures. As responsibilities increased from the initial grant based funding, Ben came on full time in 2016 and was additionally tasked with exhibition documentation and working with Conservation to develop a conservation imaging workflow. Ben has expanded the studio’s capabilities to include UV/IR imaging, photogrammetry and RTI in addition to continually growing the traditional capture potential of the space. Ben remains committed to further developing the imaging program at PAM, and is active in several professional imaging organizations, as well as attending conferences, workshops and seminars on cultural heritage imaging.

Co-Chair: Christopher Ciccone, Photographer & Digital Asset Manager, North Carolina Museum of Art

I have been a Collections Photographer at the North Carolina Museum of Art since 2000, and an MCN member since 2014. My current duties also include digital asset administration and I am a member of MCN’s DAM SIG. Prior to my museum tenure I worked in a variety of commercial photographic settings. Having experienced the industry transition from film to digital has given me a broad perspective on the challenges and opportunities in the field. Membership in the MCN Digital Imaging SIG has been extremely helpful to me in my profession and I am enthusiastic about contributing to its ongoing success. I’m particularly interested in encouraging more practical and technical imaging presentations at MCN conferences as well as facilitating ongoing engagement and collaboration between large and small institutions. I look forward to the opportunity to serve and will do my best to sustain the excellent leadership of our current Chairs.

Human-Centered Design SIG

Chair: Seema Rao, Principal & CEO, Brilliant Idea Studio

Seema Rao head shotSeema Rao has worked in museums for nearly 20 years at the interstices of visitor experience, education, and technology. She heads Brilliant Idea Studio, a firm that helps museums develop the best experiences for all their visitors. Trained as a UX Designer, her particularly focus is on content strategy. She has presented at MCN for many years speaking on social media in education, content development, and educational technology. She has been involved in many other aspects of MCN, including volunteering for MCN50, serving on the initial DEAI committee, and co-chairing the Volunteer committee.

Co-Chair: Cathy Sigmond, Research Associate, RK&A, Inc.

Cathy Sigmond is a Research Associate at RK&A, Inc., a firm in Alexandria, VA and New York City that partners with cultural organizations across the country on intentional planning, research, and evaluation. In her work as an evaluator, Cathy helps museum professionals think strategically about the audiences they intend to serve. She is a strong advocate for integrating research and evaluation into all aspects of museum work– particularly, exhibition and program development — to help practitioners understand how the interplay of design, messaging, and the built environment affect the visitor experience. Most recently, she evaluated approaches to digital interactives at a children’s museum, conducted message testing for an exhibition on fossils and climate change, and assessed usability and messaging for an exhibition on the future of New York City. Cathy has spoken about the value of evaluation and design research for museums at a variety of conferences and universities, including the Museum Computer Network, Visitor Studies Association, and the Fashion Institute of Technology. Prior to joining RK&A, Cathy earned her master’s degree in Museum Education from Tufts University and worked as an educator and researcher in a variety of science, history, and art museums.

Educational & Interpretive Media SIG

Chair: Alicia Viera, Interpretive Planner, Detroit Institute of Arts

Alicia Viera is currently an Interpretive Planner at the Detroit Institute of Arts where she continues to advance her goal of facilitating meaningful connections with art. While at the DIA, Alicia has developed interpretive plans for gallery projects and exhibitions, and has written content for analog and digital interpretive components. Most recently, she has worked on the award-winning augmented reality tour Lumin at the DIA as well as exhibitions such as “Making Home: Contemporary Works from the DIA,” “Church: A Painter’s Pilgrimage,” “Ofrendas: Celebrating el Día de Muertos,” and the upcoming “Ruben & Isabel Toledo: Labor of Love.” Before moving to Detroit, Alicia was arts administrator, director of cultural programs, and acting curator in San Antonio, Texas, where she organized “Contemporary Latino Art: El Corazón de San Antonio,” “Arte y Tradición de la Frontera: The U.S. – México Borderlands in the Works of Santa Barraza and Carmen Lomas Garza,” “The Texas Size Breach Collaborative: From El Paso to San Antonio” as well as “Absolute Resolution: A Participatory Photography Exhibition.” In these exhibitions, as well as those at the DIA, she explored the use of technology and social media for interpretative engagement—one of her current interests. Alicia holds a Ph.D. and M.A. in Art Education and Arts Administration respectively from Florida State University, where she also completed graduate certificates in Museum Studies, Art Museum Education, and Program Evaluation. Additionally, she holds a Bachelor of Fine Arts in Graphic Design. Her research interests include edu-curation, visitor-centered and multilingual exhibitions, supported interpretation (SI), and multiculturalism and inclusivity in art museums and galleries. She strives for developing exhibitions that are non-authoritative and that facilitate the understanding and appreciation of art by engaging new and current museum audiences in more relevant and meaningful museum experiences that can enrich their personal lives and those of their loved ones.

Co-Chair: Melissa Mair, Senior Interpretation Planner, Carnegie Museum of Art

In her current role as Senior Interpretation Planner at the Carnegie Museum of Art, Melissa Mair focuses specifically on visitor engagement in the permanent collection galleries. Working within an interdisciplinary core team, she concentrates on realizing the goals of the museum’s Collecting Experiences initiative, which prioritizes collaborating with audiences and embracing multiple narratives. Prior to coming to CMOA, Melissa worked for five years in the Interpretation department of the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art. Throughout her career, Melissa has worked on a variety of educational and interpretative materials, from videos to interactives and immersive audio walks.

Intellectual Property SIG 

Chair: Ama Iromuanya, Intellectual Property & Digital Rights Administrator, Dallas Museum of Art

In his current capacity as the Intellectual Property & Digital Rights Administrator at The Dallas Museum of Art, Ama oversees the management, distribution, and procurement of intellectual property and rights related information. He works cross-departmentally with publications, marketing, exhibitions, curatorial, and other areas within the institution. Ama has been instrumental to major projects such as the development of the museum’s Open Access Policy and has worked to streamline rights & reproduction workflows. He believes that IP presents a unique and engaging challenge that is relevant to every facet of a museum.

Co-Chair: Margaret McKee, Digital Asset Manager, The Menil Collection

Margaret C. McKee is the Digital Asset Manager at the Menil Collection in Houston, Texas. Her department oversees rights and reproductions, and she co-authored the institution’s internal fair use policy. Previously, she worked in photographic and imaging services at the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston. She holds an AA from Bard College at Simon’s Rock, a BAFA in Art History from the University of New Mexico, and an MS in Information Studies from the University of Texas at Austin. This spring she will complete a two-year term as co-chair of the Visual Resources Association’s Intellectual Property Rights Committee.

Information Technology SIG

Chair: Janice Craddock, Information Technology Director, Amon Carter Museum

Janice Craddock headshotAs Director of Information Technology, Janice heads a department of three to provide technical support for about 120 staff. In her thirty years at the Amon Carter Museum of American Art, she has seen firsthand how technology has changed, evolving into an increasingly vital role supporting the institutional mission—a change she has also witnessed during her twenty years involved with MCN. As IT SIG chair, Janice’s aim is to support new IT professionals and engage those with more experience in ongoing conversations about the fundamentals of IT operations and emerging technologies.

Co-Chair: Brian Dawson, Chief Digital Officer, Ingenium (Canada’s Museums of Science and Innovation)

Brian is the Chief Digital Officer at the Canada Science and Technology Museums Corporation, which also operates the Canada Aviation and Space Museum and the Canada Agriculture and Food Museum.  As CDO, Brian drives the development and implementation of the strategy for digital platforms, content, distribution and engagement throughout the organization, leading a team of information technology, digital media and exhibition specialists. Prior to joining the museum, Brian worked at Nortel Networks in telephony software development and process improvement. Brian holds a Bachelor of Computer Science from the Dalhousie University (Technical University of Nova Scotia) and a Bachelor of Business Administration from the University of Cape Breton. Brian is keen to help keep connections alive and conversations going through the year, with a regular rhythm of topic discussions, leverage tools such as the Basecamp platform more fully, and sounding out the SIG on additional ideas.

International Image Interoperability Framework SIG

Chair:  Stefano Cossu, Software Architect, J. Paul Getty Trust

Stefano Cossu was Director of Application Services at the Art Institute of Chicago from 2012 to 2018 where he oversaw the implementation of a DAMS for the Collections and the publishing of 100,000 collection images online using IIIF. He recently joined the Getty Trust as a Software Architect, where he is collaboratively implementing a large-scale consolidation of the Getty’s visual materials, many millions of images from several Getty programs that will be served online via IIIF. Stefano is an advocate of open source, open access, open standards, and digital literacy in the humanities. He is currently a member of the Fedora Steering Group, the IIIF technical review committee, and chair of the MCN IIIF SIG. He has spoken at MCN and other digital cultural heritage conferences about Linked Data, repository technologies, DAM, and IIIF.

Co-Chair: Emmanuelle Delmas-Glass, Collections Data Manager, Yale Center for British Art

Emmanuelle is currently the Collections Data Manager at the Yale Center for British Art, where she started working in 2006 as the Collections Catalog Specialist. In her current role, she oversees the creation of and access to the museum’s collections data. She plays the lead role in ensuring its intellectual and technical integrity. She identifies and implements new data standards and technologies to disseminate to as wide an audience as possible as well as to support the scholarly mission of the Center. She is currently the Secretary for the International Image Interoperability Framework, and has been an ICOM CIDOC board member since 2013. She previously worked at the Williams College Museum of Art and the Louvre Museum. She has a Master’s of Art History from Virginia Commonwealth University.

Media Production & Branding SIG

Chair:  Kelsey Cvach, Digital Content Producer, U.S. Department of State

Kelsey Cvach is passionate about digital storytelling, communicative design and user experience. She’s also excited about leading museums in communicating their value and creating compelling, mutually beneficial experiences for their target audiences. In my past 18 months at the United States Diplomacy Center, a new museum in development in Washington D.C. telling the story of American diplomacy and inspiring discovery of its global impact. I lead our museum’s rebrand, built and implemented style guide, redesigned and launched our website in WordPress, and wrote our digital strategy and the digital components of our museum’s interpretive plan. I also led other projects, such as our first hackathon, and exhibit testing at the Smithsonian Museum of American History. In my three previous roles, I also led branding efforts, including implementing website redesigns, building style guides, leading mission and vision defining activities, and unifying sub-brands.

Co-Chair: Kelsey will be looking to appoint someone to join her as co-chair during 2019.

Social Media SIG

Chair: Alexis Light, Senior Manager of Media Relations and Marketing, The Frick Collection

Alexis LightAlexis Light is currently the Senior Manager of Media Relations and Marketing at The Frick Collection, where she has worked since 2007. Throughout her tenure at the museum, she has been deeply involved in the role social media has played in shaping the voice of the institution and how it is used to communicate to its various audiences. As Social Media SIG chair, she hopes to strengthen our community of members, continue an open dialogue between colleagues, and evaluate strategies for ongoing cross-institutional collaboration through social. She received an M.A. in Modern Art, Connoisseurship and the History of the Art Market from Christie’s, New York, and a B.A. from Saint Louis University, St. Louis, Missouri. She has been actively participating in MCN since 2015.

Co-Chair: Jonathan Munar, Director of Digital Media and Strategy, Art21

Jonathan Munar headshotJonathan Munar is the Director of Digital at Art21, heading the organization’s digital presence across Web, social media, and related platforms. Previously, Jonathan was a member of the Website department at The Metropolitan Museum of Art. He has served on the board of the American Alliance of Museums (AAM) Media & Technology Professional Network and has been a presenter, guest lecturer, contributor, and panelist for organizations such as New York University, Baruch College, Art Dealers Association of America, Museum Computer Network, Museums and the Web, the New Media Consortium (NMC) Horizon Report, and the New York City ArtsTech Meetup.

Strategy SIG

Chair: Douglas Hegley, Chief Digital Officer, Minneapolis Institute of Art

Douglas Hegley joined the museum sector in 1997, after previous stints in higher education and pediatric research. During 14 years at The Metropolitan Museum of Art, he helped create collaborative technology operations and deliver engaging digital content to visitors. In 2011 he joined the Minneapolis Institute of Art, where as the Chief Digital Officer he sets the vision and strategy for all digital media and technology efforts, and aims to deliver engaging stories to all audiences via digital channels. Mr. Hegley has been recognized by his peers as a leader in the field, and has served on the boards and committees of several cultural heritage organizations, including the Minnesota Association of Museums, and MCN.

Co-Chair: Mark McKay, Director of Digital, Art Gallery of Ontario

Mark McKay headshotMark leads a 10 person division made up of 3 departments. Responsible for developing and executing an action plan in support of the AGO’s Technology Strategy. Google Analytics and Adwords certified content marketer. 12 years experience creating branded content and more than 7 years leading corporate digital and social media strategy. Trained in Project Management and Business Analysis. Eleven years of experience in the entertainment industry. Hands on advanced production knowledge of web development, design, video, and animation set me apart from my peers.


Don’t belong to a SIG yet? Want to join one or more? Click on the SIG links above and you’ll find a signup form on each SIG’s page, you can join as many SIGs as you like!

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Elect SIG Chairs for 2019!

Each December, we ask the MCN community to elect the Chairs of our Special Interest Groups. SIGs, as we call them, are volunteer-led MCN members’ communities of practice that operate under the oversight of the MCN board and Executive Director. SIGs are organized around specific topics of interest or niche practice areas that reflect the diversity of the many technology and digital practices in the museum field (curious about how SIGs are governed? Read the SIG Charter).

These community led groups embody MCN’s grassroots’ history and the dynamism that drives the larger musetech community. Two new SIGs were created last year: Human-Centered Design SIG and IIIF SIG.

SIG Chairs are all volunteers with a passion for their work and for helping their colleagues and the community around their specific practice area and beyond. This year brings many changes with 12 SIG Chairs stepping down. On behalf of MCN, I’d like to thank them for their service and their work over the past years: Kristin Bayans, Christophe Buffet, Daniel Dennehy, Brad Dunn, John ffrench, Jennifer Foley, Melissa Fournier, Elissa Frankle Olinsky, Kurt Heumiller, Mandy Kritzeck, Jennifer Sellar and Elena Villaespesa.

As you review this year’s slate of candidates, you’ll notice 11 new faces, some familiar, some brand new, ready to lead your SIGs next year. Please take a moment to cast your vote now through December 15 and help support the leadership and future direction of our community.

ELECT YOUR SIG CHAIRS! (now closed)

Headshot
Eric Longo
Executive Director, MCN
eric@mcn.edu

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Volunteer and Join the MCN Community!

The end of year is a busy time for everyone, but it’s a particularly busy time at MCN this year! Between now and early January, MCN offers a number of volunteer and professional development opportunities whose deadlines for application are fast approaching. Apply today to shape MCN and its programs, take advantage of professional development opportunities, expand your network, and add a line (or two) to your resume.

So to make sure you don’t miss that precious deadline, we’ve clarified all the available options!

MCN 2019 Mentorship Program

Application deadline: November 30, 2018 EXTENDED THRU DECEMBER 3, 2018 EOD
Program duration: 9 months (January-November 2019)
Openings: 20–24 spots for mentor/mentee pairs
Questions? Email: profdev@mcn.edu
InformationMentor Application | Mentee Application

Now in its third year, MCN’s mentorship program offers a unique professional development opportunity whether you are a veteran or a newbie in the museum tech community. Expand your professional network, build and grow leadership skills, practice personal communication strategies, and much more.

DEAI Advisory Board

Application deadline: December 1, 2018 EXTENDED THRU DECEMBER 3, 2018 EOD
Term: 1 year
Openings: 12–20
Questions? Email: diversity@mcn.edu
Information | Application

We’re assembling a new advisory board to focus on diversity, equity, accessibility and inclusion at MCN. Members will meet on a quarterly basis to share their expertise, advise on DEAI policies, help prioritize strategic goals, and support new initiatives.

Conference Program Co-Chairs

Application deadline: December 16, 2018
Term: 2 years (2019-2020)
Openings: 2
Questions? Email: program@mcn.edu
Information & Application

Program Co-Chairs will provide leadership for the annual MCN Conference in 2019 and 2020, from sourcing members of the Program Committee to leading the conversation around a theme for the annual conference to developing general topic guidelines and organizing and scheduling a range of creative formats from workshops, to panels and presentations.

2019 Conference Program Committee members

Application deadline: January 12, 2019
Term: 9 months (January-November 2019)
Openings: ~40
Questions? Email: program@mcn.edu
Information & Application

Under the leadership of the Program Co-Chairs, the Program Committee helps establish the conference theme and identify a keynote speaker. Committee members also review between 10-15 proposal submissions according to a variety of criteria designed to ensure quality, expertise, innovation and a fair representation of different perspectives and voices, especially from communities that are traditionally under-represented or minorities to ensure that the program of the annual conference reflects the diversity of the MCN community and the extended musetech community.

Wait, there’s more …

SIG Chairs Annual Elections

Application deadline: November 28, 2018
Online Elections: December 1-15, 2018
Term: 9 months (January-November 2019)
Openings: 12
Questions? Email: sigs@mcn.edu
Information

MCN members can join SIGs for free, and elections to elect SIGs’ chairs and co-chairs are held annually from December 1 through 15, 2018. If interested, ask SIG chairs.

Share you IT/digital skills to help improve MCN’s digital platforms!

Application deadline: December 15, 2018
Term: 12 months (January-December 2019)
Openings: 5-10+
Questions? Email: tech@mcn.edu
Application

MCN is calling out to all the tech/digital nerds out there to put their talent to work by contributing their time and effort, including product/tool research and assessment, coding, strategy, communications and writing, to improve MCN’s digital platforms so you can be a part of the greater sum of all of us by supporting MCN’s new strategic objective “[To] transform MCN’s online presence into a powerful and intuitive user-centered destination”.

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The Conference, Captured

 

The annual conference is next week in Denver and we couldn’t be more excited for the amazing program lined up. Of course not everyone’s able to attend the conference, and everyone at the conference won’t be able to attend every session they want. So we’re relying on speakers (and anyone else they can recruit to help them!) to share their session materials and outcomes with the full MCN community before, during and after the conference. And not just presentation slides, but blog posts, audio recordings or video captures, twitter stories, Facebook and Instagram live, handouts and links to resource, whatever can be put together!

web browser with MCN's youtube channel home page

Over the past several years, MCN has audio recorded most sessions and shared them on YouTube. It’s a great way to catch sessions you missed, or to follow up on sessions you attended. Still, most recordings get only modest use. So we’re looking for better ways of capturing and sharing conference content and will be developing new strategies and systems for that over the next few years. In the meantime however, Denver …

For all you speakers out there, we’re asking you take the lead in capturing your session in whatever way you think best. We imagine that might simply be slides for some of you, but others might prefer to share a list of resources and links. Some of you might like to do a blog post after the fact, or ask a friend in the audience to take (or draw) notes they can share. If you’re technically savvy, or at least technically adventurous, you might want to take a shot at recording yourself either in audio or video. However, you do it, we love it and want to see it.

Speakers, check out our capturing tips below and send what you can, when you can to content@mcn.edu. See you next week!

Speaker Tips & Tricks

Slides

Since you probably make them anyway, slides can be an easy way to share your presentation. You can post yours on SlideShare or Speaker Deck. If you used Google Slides just make that link public and call it a day. Or consider using Notist, which allows you to add related links and social media posts, and also lets people see your slide notes, which can help otherwise sparse slides make sense to someone not lucky enough to have heard you in person. In fact you might consider simply exporting your slides with the notes, and sharing it as a PDF.

Handouts

Did you give out a handout in your session? Did your slide deck include a slide full of links to related resources? Throw those into a Google Doc, or make them into a PDF and put them in Dropbox to share that way.

Blog posts

Still have a blog or personal site somewhere? Consider posting a write-up of your session and maybe some downloads for the slides and links to related resources or even your other talks. Don’t have a site of your own? Medium has your number, and it can be an easy solution. Like for the series of posts from last February’s MCNx London.

Audio recordings

Here’s one we’re going to try. Buy or borrow an inexpensive lavalier microphone, and record yourself! Plug it into your phone with Voice Memos (iPhone) or Voice Recorder (Android), or directly into your computer, and hit record. With or without some basic editing afterward, the resulting audio file can be shared on SoundCloud or as a direct download from Google Drive or Dropbox.

Screen capture

Depending on how you’re going to present, you might try a screen capture of your session with a free tool like Screencast-o-matic. This may not work easily if you’re using slides in presenter mode, but if you’re simply mirroring your display to show slides, or browser windows, or a pdf, you can capture all or part of the screen along with the audio to make a webinar-like video of your session. Add in an inexpensive lavalier mic for better sound. Post it to YouTube or Vimeo when you’re done.

Video recordings

Okay, this is next level but you could try video recording yourself, or you could recruit a friend to help. Set your phone up in the front row or on the projector table with a portable tripod, add in a lavalier mic with a looong cord for better sound quality if you can, and hit record. This will work best if you can find an angle that shows you and your slides relatively clearly. The resulting masterpiece can be posted to YouTube or Vimeo. If you add a list of highlight moments with timestamps into the description field, YouTube will even create a clickable index for you.

Whatever you create, send it to content@mcn.edu and we’ll help share it out. #musetech fame awaits!

animated gif of standing ovation in large theater

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Humanizing the Un-Conference: Present Your Conference Session Ideas

…at the Conference!

 

Post by Max Evjen

 

#MCN2015 workshop attendees seated and standing around a table

Always coming up with ideas for proposals while socializing with other #musetech professionals at MCN? Want to build upon what you’ve heard while it’s still fresh? This brand-new kind of session is for you! Submit your ideas for the MCN Humanizing the Un-Conference! This is an effort to create the ultimate flexibility in the conference schedule, so the entire block of 45-minute concurrent sessions on Friday, November 16th, from 3:15–4 p.m., has been dedicated to ideas that you and your colleagues will come up with while at #MCN2018.

 

Here’s how it works:

  • Post your ideas on the “HTU” sign-up sheet in the MCN Lounge on Tuesday and Wednesday of the conference to get interest from others who want to be a part of your session (and tweet #MCN2018-HTU to search for others over Twitter)
  • Talk with other people interested in your idea—they can join you as co-presenters or just attend and participate in the discussion.
  • Turn your ideas into proposals that you post in the Humanizing the Un-conference area of the MCN Lounge 8AM to 5PM on Thursday.
  • Sessions will be assigned to available rooms on Thursday evening and room assignments for accepted proposals will be listed on the easel pad in the Humanizing the Un-conference area of the MCN Lounge, on signs outside the conference rooms where the session are held, in the #MCN2018 app, and will be announced on MCN’s Twitter account.

Examples of session descriptions could look like:

 

  • What is a Pilot, and how do I do that? is a discussion about piloting digital initiatives, and how you can make them work in your organization.
  • This Digital Thing is Dead.  A session for #musetech folks to commiserate over tech projects in museums that utterly failed.  We’ll discuss how we might possibly change those failures to successes.
  • Present your session from 3:15 – 4 p.m. Friday!

 

All rooms will have easel pads, markers, post it notes, and A/V capability.

Join us for this one of a kind experience!  We can’t wait to see how you create the conference’s final discussions, and where that will take us after MCN!

 

Max Evjen headshot

Max Evjen

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MCN’s commitment to Diversity, Equity, Accessibility, & Inclusion

 

Post by MCN Board Member, Desi Gonzalez

MCN 2017 keynote crowd photo with Diversity, Equity, Accessibility, and Inclusion overlaid text.

One of the things I’ve found to be special about the MCN community is that it’s made up of people who are genuinely interested in building inclusive museum technologies for diverse audiences. You can see this grassroots energy each year at the annual conference, where sessions titles such as “Accessible, Inclusive, Digital Design” and “Taking Action on Inclusion” feel right at home. Over the last year, a small working group has been meeting regularly to investigate how we might be able to weave this culture of equity and inclusion into the organizational fabric of MCN. We began by conducting research into proven practices in diversity and inclusion in peer organizations, as well as examining areas in which our own organization can grow.

 

Today, I’m thrilled to publicly announce MCN’s commitment to holistically reexamining all of its programs, practices, and policies from the lens of equity and inclusion. We’ve developed a statement that describes this commitment. We back up the statement with definitions that outline what we mean when we say we value things like diversity, equity, accessibility, and inclusion (DEAI). This area is so important to us that we made “Embed diversity, equity, accessibility and inclusion in everything we do” one of the five pillars in our new 2019–2021 strategic plan.

 

The work MCN has done in the past has come from a good place, but it’s been piecemeal and primarily focused on the annual conference. A few years ago, we implemented a Friendly Space Policy, establishing shared guidelines for making the conference a safe and respectful place for all attendees. Through our scholarship program, we are able to offer financial support to attend the conference for individuals who Identify as part of a group that is traditionally underrepresented or otherwise marginalized.

 

MCN is much more than a just conference, and thus our future DEAI efforts will extend much further. Over the next few years, we hope to pilot professional development opportunities and programming that critically address the role of diversity, equity, inclusion, and accessibility in museum technology. We plan to examine how we might be able to institute more equitable recruitment as well as provide support or compensation for people who contribute their time and labor to the organization; this includes but is not limited to MCN Board Members, Conference Program Chairs, SIG Chairs, conference presenters and attendees, scholarship recipients, and volunteers. And finally, we want to support the wonderful DEAI organizing that is already happening within our museum technology community.

 

Of course, diversity, equity, accessibility, and inclusion work is never complete—it’s not something that we can check off a box and say we’re done after a three-year strategic plan. Additionally, it’s not something that only a small group can accomplish; it requires input from our whole community.

 

We’d like to invite you to take part in our DEAI efforts. We’re forming an advisory board that will meet on a quarterly basis to share their expertise and help prioritize strategic goals. We hope to select 12 to 20 members who represent wide-ranging dimensions of diversity, with an eye towards giving voice to underrepresented groups. For our organization, diversity means a lot of things. Advisors will represent groups that are historically marginalized or excluded due to race, gender identity and expression, sexual orientation, ability, economic background, and age. We’re also looking for members from a wide range of cultural institutions and professional roles, considering dimensions such as subject matter expertise, organization size, and stage in career.

 

Applications are due December 1, so submit yours now!

 

And whether or not you join the advisory board, we’d like to hear from you about how MCN can foster inclusion and equity within the organization. Another pillar in our new strategic plan is to identify opportunities for, connect with, and involve all of our members who want to contribute to work going on within our organization.

 

To learn how you can be involved, or to share any questions or concerns regarding DEAI at MCN, please contact diversity@mcn.edu. Additionally, we encourage you to swing by our annual conference session MCN Diversity, Equity, & Inclusion: Where are we, and where are we headed?, where you can voice how you’d like to see DEAI initiatives go in the future.

 

Headshot of Desi Gonzalez, MCN Board Member

Desi Gonzalez, MCN Board Member

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Announcing MCN 2019-2021 Strategic Plan: Achieving impact through inclusion, innovation, and community building

 

Updated mission and vision statements, summer 2018

  • To grow the digital capacity of museum professionals by connecting them to ideas, information, opportunities, proven practices, and each other.
  • A world in which all museums are empowered digitally to achieve their missions.

 

We’re pleased to announce MCN’s new three-year strategic plan (2019-2021), which was developed following a productive and energetic strategic retreat with the full board in Washington, DC this past June.

Board strategic retreat June 2018

Three years ago, in June 2015, the then-board of MCN convened in Princeton, NJ to develop a 3-year strategic plan: “Celebrating 50 Years: Advancing Transformation & Innovation in Museums” (2016-2018). MCN had operated without a formal strategic plan for roughly five years, and it had become necessary to get back on track.

The four-page document was intentionally brief: it cast a vision around five strategic priorities each with a set of non-exhaustive success criteria designed to give future board members buy-in, agency, and creativity to develop a series of tactical tasks under each of the plan’s larger objectives. These tactical tasks were documented in three successive annual “Work Plans” that also served as a tool to track progress. Much was accomplished over the past three years: increasing year-round professional development opportunities with the launch of MCN’s mentorship program (now in its second year), growing the SIGs, and improving MCN’s governance and operations, culminating in 2017 with the celebration of MCN’s 50th anniversary, which galvanized our community and resulted in many inspiring community-led projects such as MCN50 Voices.

Going into this year’s strategic development process, we started by looking at what was achieved and what wasn’t, before identifying the most urgent challenges and risks that MCN currently faces. We found ourselves asking many of the same questions we had three years earlier: What is MCN’s core purpose? How do we best serve the needs of our community? How do we ensure that we have adequate resources to support and deliver on our mission? And perhaps, more fundamentally, how do we ensure MCN’s long-term sustainability?

To respond to these questions, we developed five key strategic priorities to focus MCN’s work and frame our decision-making from 2019 through 2021:

  1. Mobilize members of the MCN community
  2. Refine our products and value
  3. Achieve long-term sustainability
  4. Transform MCN’s online platforms
  5. Embed diversity, equity, accessibility and inclusion in everything we do

Lastly, in spite of many recent improvements in governance and operational principles that give MCN the support it needs to run effectively, we noticed a few issues calling for our attention. Among them, a lack of continuity in the transfer of institutional memory from outgoing to incoming board members, at a time when the former’s knowledge and experience are at their peak. So the Governance Committee will look at ways to remedy those issues.

Since its beginnings, MCN has been, and remains today more than ever, a community organization. The work invested behind the scenes to strengthen MCN is only driven by our desire to serve the needs of our community and to support each an everyone of you throughout your professional lives in museums. This next strategic plan is designed to grow MCN’s capacity to deliver on its mission so all museums are empowered digitally to achieve theirs.

Eric Longo
Executive Director

MCN 2019-2012 Strategic Plan

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Board Class of 2018: meet MCN’s newly appointed board members!

From a pool of 17 candidates, the 2018 Nominating Committee selected five nominees to fill the board vacancies. Endorsing the Committee’s recommendations, the board appointed the following five candidates to serve as Directors on the board of MCN:  Nathan Adkisson, Doug Allen, Kai Frazier, Mara Kurlandsky and Courtney OCallaghan (see bios below).

Their three-year term will start this November. Please join me in congratulating them on their appointment.

We also want to extend a sincere thanks to all the other candidates who, driven by their passion for MCN and a desire to serve our community, also took the time to apply this year. Don’t let this discourage you from applying again in future years: often the choice between two candidates is timing and context. Many of our current board members applied more than once before being nominated.

So if you weren’t selected this time around, we want you to know that MCN is your community, and we encourage you to stay involved. There are many opportunities to get involved with MCN in addition to serving on the board, and we invite you to look into an opportunity that’s right for you. We are always looking for volunteers to co-lead or join the annual Conference Program Committee; you could serve as a SIG chair (elections are held annually in December); and we will soon be announcing the creation of a Diversity, Equity and Inclusion task force and we’ll be looking for folks to serve on that as well. In many cases, a candidate’s demonstrated commitment to MCN will put them in good stead for a board role in future. For any questions about Professional Development opportunities, email us at ProfDev@mcn.edu.

The board also appointed Matt Tarr as Vice-President/President-Elect effective November 2018. Matt will serve as VP in 2019 and will succeed Elizabeth Bollwerk as MCN’s President in 2020.

Lastly, this November, three amazing board members and respected community members will be leaving the board as their term ends: Suse Anderson, who is serving as President this year, Bert Degenhart Drenth, Treasurer, and Laura Mann.

I hope you will join us in Denver for MCN 2018, and we look forward to seeing you there.

Eric Longo
Executive Director
eric@mcn.edu

2018 Nominating Committee

  • Suse Anderson, President
  • Elizabeth Bollwerk, Vice President
  • Laura Mann, Director
  • Mitch Sava, Director
  • Eric Longo, Executive Director

Nathan Adkisson

Director of Strategy & Associate Creative Director, Local Projects (NYC)

Nathan Adkisson

Nathan Adkisson is the Director of Strategy and Associate Creative Director at Local Projects. His clients include numerous cultural institutions including the Cleveland Museum of Art, the American Museum of Natural History and ARoS Art Museum in Aarhus, Denmark. He also launched Target Open House, a permanent concept store for the Internet of Things in downtown San Francisco. Currently, he is developing Planet Word, a 50,000 square foot museum of language scheduled to open in 2019 in Washington, D.C.

Before joining Local Projects, Nathan was a senior strategist at renowned digital agency Big Spaceship where he led projects for Crayola, Chobani, Belvedere, Google, Samsung, Sonos, Purina, AOL, and Fiji water. He began his career as a journalist, holding reporter positions for the Austin American-Statesman and Money magazine. He holds a Bachelor of Science in Journalism from Northwestern University.

Doug Allen

Chief Information Officer, The Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art (Kansas City, MO)

Doug Allen

Doug Allen is the chief information officer at the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art where he oversees the design, implementation and support of technology for the museum’s staff, patrons and visitors. He has over 30 years of experience in the Information Services industry in positions as diverse as computer programmer, hardware repair technician and networking engineer. For the past two decades, he has served as CIO for Pioneer Financial Services, Johnson County Community College and Franklin Savings and Loan.

Doug has published two books, “Learning Guide to the Internet” (Sybex) and “Internet Explorer 5 At A Glance” (Microsoft Press). He has also authored several courses on a variety of personal computer technologies, including Internet Search Engines and HTML/Web Publishing. A nationally known lecturer, Doug has developed and delivered over 50 different seminars on Social Media, Cloud Computing, Presentation Software and ePublishing.

A leader in the Kansas City technology community, Doug has been a member of the Silicon Prairie Association, several local user groups and was a founding member and President of ITKC. On the national scene, Doug has served on advisory panels for Microsoft, Compaq, ComputerLand, SCT and others.

Kai Frazier

Founder & CEO | Museum Storyteller, Curated x Kai (San Francisco, CA)

Kai Frazier

Kai is a historian (B.A History) and innovative educator (M.Ed) passionate about utilizing technology to provide inclusive opportunities and increased exposure for underrepresented communities.

She is the founder & CEO of Curated x Kai, an award-winning virtual reality company which films inclusive VR field trips in museums and other cultural institutions. Through intense outreach, CxK delivers those experiences to students & young adults, including those in underserved communities.

Before creating Curated x Kai, she worked with several museums such as the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum as well as the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History & Culture, specializing in digital strategy and content creation.

Kai is a DC Fem Tech Award recipient, which celebrates power women in code, design, and data. In addition, Kai is a fellow of Facebook’s Oculus Launchpad which provides people from underrepresented backgrounds funding and resources to ensure diversity of thought in the VR ecosystem.

Mara Kurlandsky

Digital Projects Manager, National Museum of Women in the Arts (Washington, DC)

Mara Kurlandski

Mara Kurlandsky is the Digital Projects Manager at the National Museum of Women in the Arts, where she oversees the museum’s website, social media, and interactive digital content, coordinates the award-winning annual social media campaign #5WomenArtists, and leads the development of digital strategy. Before joining NMWA, Mara was a Project Coordinator at Gallagher & Associates where she worked on developing museum exhibitions, including the Spy Museum, the Flight 93 National Memorial Visitor Center, and the Museum of the Jewish People in Tel Aviv.

Mara fell in love with museums as a kid at the Art Institute of Chicago, and decided to make museums her career during a visit to The Museum of New Zealand/Te Papa Tongarewa. She believes strongly in the potential of museums for building community and making social change, and in 2017, led an international campaign for museums to stand up for their missions and reject “alternative facts.” She sees the leveraging of digital technologies in cultural institutions as a key tool in making museums relevant in the 21st century.

In addition to serving on the MCN Board, Mara is a part of the American Alliance of Museums Media & Technology Professional Network leadership team. She has given presentations at MCN, MuseumNext, the Council of American Jewish Museums Conference, and at the Georgetown and George Washington Universities about how to start a career in museum technology.  Mara holds an M.A. in Museum Studies from the George Washington University and a B.A. in Jewish Studies from the University of Toronto.

Courtney OCallaghan

Chief Digital Officer, Freer Gallery of Art & Sackler Gallery (Washington, DC)

Courtney OCallaghan

Courtney OCallaghan has spent nearly two decades in the IT world as a designer, developer, user experience negotiator, and everything in between.

Courtney currently works at the Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Galleries, Smithsonian Institution, as the museums’ first Chief Digital Officer and head of the Digital Media and Technology department. She oversees the ongoing museums’ goal of sharing its collection through all relevant digital means.

Prior to the Freer|Sackler, she worked as the IT Director of the Feminist Majority Foundation and online editor of Ms. magazine. Her educational background is in Women and Gender Studies, Ethnographic Film, and Creative Writing of Poetry.

She continues to volunteer as an organizer and developer in the Open Source world, focusing on diversity and accessibility in the community.

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The MCN 2018 Program is DONE

After moving a few million cells around our Program Team Google Sheets, the schedule for MCN 2018 is complete and will be going live soon. Here are a few highlights from this year’s program:

  • In addition to three pre-conference tours and eight workshops, we have a new Tuesday offering—a pair of “MCN Field Trips,” combining a visit to a local artist’s space with a lively discussion of a conference-theme-related topic.
  • For the second straight year we have several “other-format” sessions, including all-day drop-in teaching sites for DIY digital experiences and UX techniques, the return of group peer-mentoring with #MCNergy, and a laid-back Slow Looking space.
  • There will be an unconference for Social Media and, this year, “Humanizing the Unconference,” with opportunities for impromptu attendee-driven sessions on the final day of MCN.
  • Also on the conference’s final day, we have a block of sessions devoted to presentations by museum technologists from Denver-area institutions.
  • Finally, our 11 Special Interest Groups (SIGs) have each endorsed a conference session. Check them out!
    • From Folders to Facets: Improving the DAM User Experience for Creative Types | DAM SIG
    • Developing Process as Product in a Time of Change: Building the Miranda Digital Asset Platform at the Folger Shakespeare Library | IIIF SIG
    • Strategies for Scale and Sustainability | Strategy SIG
    • Toward a DAMS-driven Licensing Platform | IP SIG
    • Modern IT Infrastructure for the Museum of Tomorrow | IT SIG
    • DIY Digital Playground: A MuseTech Interpretive Media Resource and Skillshare Center | Educational and Interpretation SIG
    • An Evaluative Practice: Embracing Unanticipated Findings in Evaluation | Data and Insights SIG
    • From Request to Ingest: Creating ordering and tracking systems to make your museum imaging workflow work for you. | Digital Imaging SIG
    • When Museums Came Out to Play: #MuseumSnowballFight and Enhancing Your Digital Personality Through Collaboration | Social Media SIG
    • Pivoting to video: What museums can learn from media and journalism producers | Media and Production SIG
    • UX Lounge | Human-Centered Design SIG

Thank you all your over 200 amazing, high-quality submissions. We can’t wait for you to see the results of the Program Committee’s reviews and our tetrising of the timetable.

The Program co-chairs

Adrienne Lalli Hills, Robert Weisberg, and Catherine Devine

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2018 Call for MCN Board Directors: opens today through July 31, 2018!

We’re pleased to announce the 2018 call for candidates to be considered to serve on the Board of Directors of MCN. This year, MCN is looking to recruit four (4) Board members to replace those whose 3-year term will be ending in November.

MCN Board group image

From left to right starting with back row: Darren Milligan, Greg Albers, Keir Winesmith, Lori Byrd-McDevitt, Desi Gonzalez, Matt Tarr, Mitchell Sava, Bert Degenhart Drenth; front row: Samantha Diamond, Susan Edwards, Elizabeth Bollwerk, Laura Mann, Deborah Howes; Eric Longo in the center. Suse Anderson absent. 

Board retreat image

WHY SERVE ON THE MCN BOARD OF DIRECTORS?

MCN is a membership-based professional association that provides a space for museum professionals to connect, share resources and best practices, develop their careers, and advance digital transformation in museums.

Founded in 1967 by a group of early museum technologists eager to explore practical applications for computers in museums, MCN has provided a space for our community to connect, share their experiences and support each other, thereby leading the thinking around emerging technologies in museums. Much has changed in the past 50 years, but what sparked MCN to life then, remains unchanged today – this is a testament to its vibrancy and relevance as we continue to lead our museums into the future.

For many past and current Board members, serving on the board of MCN is a way to give back to an organization and a community that have helped them throughout their museum careers, but it also provides an enriching and valuable professional development experience. Serving on the Board gives you the opportunity to be part of a team of talented museum professionals who, together with MCN’s Executive Director and staff, shape the strategic direction of the organization and constantly think about new ways to better serve the needs of our community.

WHAT WE’RE LOOKING FOR

The Board recently spent a weekend on retreat to develop MCN’s 3-year Strategic Plan (2019-2021). As a Board member you will be integral to achieving MCN’s strategic objectives and play an important role in the growth and evolution of the organization. At their first Board meeting in November in Denver, new Board members will actively participate in developing the next calendar year Work Plan, which is a series of smaller goals and tactical tasks that support the objectives of the 3-year Strategic Plan, and guides the work of the organization and the Board for the whole year.

For MCN to have a meaningful impact on its community, it is essential that the Board of Directors be composed of committed individuals who have the relevant skills and a wide range of perspectives to effectively lead the organization. The freshly developed 2019-2021 Strategic Plan (which we will share with the community this fall) will focus on:

  1. Ensuring that MCN grows in a sustainable fashion
  2. Expand opportunities for community members to actively contribute to MCN’s projects and programs  
  3. Transform MCN’s online presence into a user-centered destination for all of your MCN needs
  4. Simplifying MCN’s various offerings as well as how we communicate their benefits to you

So we’re looking for leaders in our field to help MCN execute the current 3-year Strategic Plan (2019-2021), and to contribute their expertise to make MCN the “go-to” professional support and development organization for digital technology in museums.

While all members of the community with an interest in serving MCN are welcome to apply, this year we are particularly interested in candidates who bring specific expertise, or have a background and experience, in one or more of the following key areas:

  • Sustainable practices and development expertise: as a community-centered organization, MCN’s sole purpose is to serve its members. Faced with limited resources and capacity, MCN needs to be mindful both strategically and operationally to how it can become self-sustainable. If you have expertise running programs or organizations that resulted in demonstrated sustainable outcomes, we want to hear from you. Skills or expertise in business development, strategic partnerships, sponsorship and fundraising are equally desirable.
  • Community development: we’re seeking a board member who has empowered communities to act with more autonomy while effectively running unique support functions for the community. If you’ve led volunteer programs, fortified community-based practices, or inspired large groups to rally around projects, we’d like to hear from you.
  • Systems infrastructure: if backend infrastructure, systems administration, architecture and integration are your claim to fame, let us know. We’re looking for someone with a strong IT systems background.
  • Product development and communications strategy: the objective here is to align all of MCN’s present and future offerings on a model that emphasizes the benefits so that you clearly understand their value. We are seeking a board member with the skills and experience to help us strategically develop, implement and support a range of products or offerings. If you have prior experience in product development, as well as demonstrated skills in marketing and communication practices around messaging, we want to hear from you specifically.

WHAT’S EXPECTED OF MCN BOARD MEMBERS?

MCN’s Board of Directors is both a governance and a working board. This means that in addition to the fiduciary duties expected from Directors of a 503(c)(3) not-for-profit organization, the Board members of MCN are also expected to volunteer their time in doing hands-on project work. For most, this means taking an active role on one or more of our internal committees.

As a working board, MCN Directors are expected to dedicate about 8-12 hours per month working on MCN business, including attending  a monthly conference-call board call as well as other committee meetings. Additionally, they are also expected to attend two (2) annual board meetings in person: one the week of MCN’s Annual Conference (typically in November), and another, generally in the spring, the week of the Museums and the Web conference wherever that location may be. Directors cannot be compensated and MCN does not pay Directors for travel or other related expenses.

Once appointed, MCN Directors serve a three-year term. For reference, MCN’s By-Laws are posted on our website; feel free to familiarize yourself with them.

The MCN Governance Guidelines list the key expectations from MCN Board members:

  • 8-12 hours per month, depending upon activities
  • Play an active leadership role in delivering on MCN’s overall business in general and on assigned strategic priorities specifically
  • Attend and prepare for each Board meeting
  • Be prepared and willing to lead the Board and/or a committee
  • Join and participate actively in the activities of at least one committee
  • Follow, participate and contribute to online Board discussions in a timely manner
  • Make every reasonable effort to bring financial support to the Organization annually from external sources, e.g. identify and introduce sponsor prospects and secure sponsorships
  • Leverage personal relationships with others (including corporations, professional service firms, vendors, foundations, and individuals) to assist the staff of the Organization with implementing fundraising strategies, including adding names of potential sources of support to the Organization’s mailing list
  • Actively participate in the development of the annual conference
  • Attend the annual conference
  • Actively participate in MCN fundraising efforts
  • Travel at their own cost (MCN doesn’t cover travel expenses for Board members) to attend two (2) annual board meetings in person: one the week of MCN’s Annual Conference (typically in November), and another, generally in the spring, the week of the Museums and the Web conference wherever that location may be
  • Directors cannot be compensated and MCN does not pay Directors for travel or other related expenses

WHO WE’RE LOOKING FOR

MCN encourages people from diverse backgrounds, institutions, and experiences to apply. MCN does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, religion (creed), gender, gender expression and identity, age, national origin (ancestry), disability, marital status, sexual orientation, or military status, in any of its activities or operations.

In addition, to ensure that a diverse range of institutions are represented on the Board, each individual institution may be represented by only one member of the Board at any given time. Candidates are encouraged to review the current Board members’ list below to check the institution that they are currently affiliated with.

WHAT’S THE NOMINATION AND APPOINTMENT PROCESS?

To be considered by the 2018 Nominating Committee, please fill out and submit the application form. If you believe someone you know would be a qualified candidate, please encourage them to apply. Applications are due Sunday July 31, 2018 at 11:59pm PT. We will let you know if we require additional information about your application.

WHAT’S NEXT?

MCN’s 2018 Nominating Committee will review all applications and propose a slate of candidates to the Board of Directors for discussion, followed by a vote on the individual appointment of each proposed candidate for Director. We anticipate notifying successful candidates by early September 2018 at the latest (it’s often sooner). The newly appointed Directors will also be announced on our website and shared with the MCN community on MCN-L.

WHAT IF I HAVE MORE QUESTIONS?

If you have any additional questions, please contact Eric Longo, MCN’s Executive Director at eric@mcn.edu.

We encourage all qualified candidates to apply or hope that you will refer someone you think would be a qualified candidate.

Thank you for being a part of MCN.

MCN 2018 Nominating Committee

  •  Suse Anderson, President
  •  Elizabeth Bollwerk, VP-President Elect
  •  Laura Mann, Director
  •  Mitchell Sava, Director
  •  Eric Longo, Executive Director

2018 MCN board members list

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