The MCN 2018 Program is DONE

After moving a few million cells around our Program Team Google Sheets, the schedule for MCN 2018 is complete and will be going live soon. Here are a few highlights from this year’s program:

  • In addition to three pre-conference tours and eight workshops, we have a new Tuesday offering—a pair of “MCN Field Trips,” combining a visit to a local artist’s space with a lively discussion of a conference-theme-related topic.
  • For the second straight year we have several “other-format” sessions, including all-day drop-in teaching sites for DIY digital experiences and UX techniques, the return of group peer-mentoring with #MCNergy, and a laid-back Slow Looking space.
  • There will be an unconference for Social Media and, this year, “Humanizing the Unconference,” with opportunities for impromptu attendee-driven sessions on the final day of MCN.
  • Also on the conference’s final day, we have a block of sessions devoted to presentations by museum technologists from Denver-area institutions.
  • Finally, our 11 Special Interest Groups (SIGs) have each endorsed a conference session. Check them out!
    • From Folders to Facets: Improving the DAM User Experience for Creative Types | DAM SIG
    • Developing Process as Product in a Time of Change: Building the Miranda Digital Asset Platform at the Folger Shakespeare Library | IIIF SIG
    • Strategies for Scale and Sustainability | Strategy SIG
    • Toward a DAMS-driven Licensing Platform | IP SIG
    • Modern IT Infrastructure for the Museum of Tomorrow | IT SIG
    • DIY Digital Playground: A MuseTech Interpretive Media Resource and Skillshare Center | Educational and Interpretation SIG
    • An Evaluative Practice: Embracing Unanticipated Findings in Evaluation | Data and Insights SIG
    • From Request to Ingest: Creating ordering and tracking systems to make your museum imaging workflow work for you. | Digital Imaging SIG
    • When Museums Came Out to Play: #MuseumSnowballFight and Enhancing Your Digital Personality Through Collaboration | Social Media SIG
    • Pivoting to video: What museums can learn from media and journalism producers | Media and Production SIG
    • UX Lounge | Human-Centered Design SIG

Thank you all your over 200 amazing, high-quality submissions. We can’t wait for you to see the results of the Program Committee’s reviews and our tetrising of the timetable.

The Program co-chairs

Adrienne Lalli Hills, Robert Weisberg, and Catherine Devine

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Humanizing the … Proposal Submission Process?

Laramie Square, Denver

Denver awaits!

 

April is almost here, which means the Call for Proposals for the MCN 2018 annual conference in Denver is just around the corner! Some of you may already be thinking about what you’d like to present in November but also, and perhaps just as important, what you’d like to hear from your peers.

In his post How Might We last month, Greg Albers asked us all to consider:

How Might We make each session unique?

This question led us to make some changes to the Call for Proposal process, which we’re sharing with you below.

Click on each of the items below to read more about the changes we’ve made to the program and the proposal process.

Making Tracks

Over the years, many of you have repeatedly asked for an easier way to search the program, and specifically, an easier way to find the sessions that interest you. We listened.

This year, we’re introducing two changes. First, we no longer ask you to tag your own proposal from a list of 25 keywords. Instead, the Program Committee will do this during the review process. Second, we’re introducing four tracks that essentially represent the various practice areas currently covered by MCN’s Special Interest Groups:

  • Content
  • Strategy
  • Systems
  • Experience

Simplifying the tagging process to these 4 tracks will make navigating the conference program and identifying the sessions you want to attend easier.

Speaking of SIGs … MCN now counts 11 SIGs that are active year-round. Because of the work they do and the discussions they have around their respective practice area, SIGs are a great resource for all of you to tap into, even if you belong to a few of them, or none at all. We encourage all of you to reach out to our SIGs to discuss ideas about possible sessions or topics and for suggestions about potential co-presenters.

Which leads to our next item …

Session Formats and Timing

Less is more. This year, you’ll only have 2 options for the duration of your session: a 30 minute session and a 60 minute session. That’s it. No more 15-minute case studies and 90-minute in-depth panels.

A 30-minute session can be a case study about one project or two related projects (with a preference for two presentations from different institutions), or a presentation on a more general discussion of a particular topic. A 30-minute session can have up to three speakers.

We know that the 15-minute case study format did provide an easy entry point for MCN community members wanting to make a brief presentation, so we ask you not to think of this format change as the end of the case study, but as incentive to pair up with another presenter—or, if you don’t have someone in mind, to contact the Program team, jump onto the MCN Slack Channel, or reach out to a SIG to find someone to present with.

A 60-minute session can be a presentation offering a deeper dive into a particular topic, with up to five speakers (note the speaker limit—more on that below), or a “hands-on” technology demonstration with articulated learning outcomes (though not as intense as a half-day workshop). We believe that the five-speaker limit will incentivize discussion and audience participation. Note that all 60-minute sessions will have the option to opt for using Slido for live audience polling and question up-voting during your presentation. You will be required to participate in an online demo during the summer if you wish to use Slido in your session.

Our traditional Tuesday half-day workshops remain part of the program.

And the same holds for our popular Ignite talks, a series of five-minute, 20-slide presentations, which traditionally kicks off the conference on Tuesday night; click here for video of last year’s talks and also visit Koven Smith’s 2017 blog post on submitting an Ignite proposal. Also, we’ll make sure the location of the Ignite venue offers more opportunities to meet and congregate with your fellow MCNers when the event concludes.

Finally, we’re continuing with last year’s wide-open, “other format” proposals—you’re welcome to suggest a session like last year’s popular Green Room, #MCNergy, Listening Lounge, and “Slow Change” silent disco. (You can read more about this innovative format here.) This is not, however, a pass to propose a longer version of a 60-minute session. Think hard about what a longer-timed session will accomplish and what kind of set-up you will require. A single session can’t easily be granted consecutive blocks of time in the same space. Be persuasive! Note that “other format” proposals can involve a larger number of participating presenters, but please discuss with the Program team ahead of time.

New Voices and New Takes on Current Ideas

How Might We” also asked us to consider:

How might we ensure new ideas don’t crowd out important fundamentals and big thinking doesn’t replace hands-on skills?

Regarding the proposals themselves, we are trying to further open up the sessions for presentations by attendees who haven’t spoken before, as well as emphasizing new perspectives on important topics which we hear about every year. We’ll be asking during the submission process if proposers have presented on this topic before, and how often speakers have presented at MCN in the past. Please don’t think of this as a limit as much as a call for expanding the horizons of our discussions. Come up with unique takes and bring in current trends on issues of interest to all. Think hard about what your proposal is really adding to the reflection on your topic.

If we haven’t heard from you at MCN, we want to hear from you! We’re asking MCN veterans and newbies alike to reach across the experience aisle and bring people who haven’t presented often to the stage. For newcomers, propose sessions on what you want to learn and hear about. Use social, or SIGs, or even contact the Program chairs if you’d like help in building a team for a proposal with new people and new ideas, whether it’s hands-on approach that’ll give attendees new skills they can take back to their institutions, or a deep dive into issues that are bedeviling the field. Think about the problems that you want solved—chances are, there’s someone out there in the community who would love to get involved and join you.

Now, about that submission process … 

Some Tough Love on Submitting (and Changing) Proposals

Last year we received 205 proposals, and while it’s a joy getting so much input and participation from the community, too many proposals were submitted in various stages of incompleteness: some showed “speakers TBD” or speakers were listed in the wrong field, some were missing short or long abstracts, others didn’t list the session leader and co-presenters correctly, others were missing bios or emails for speakers, which made contacting session participants more difficult.

While we understand that submitting a conference proposal is often time-consuming, reviewing incomplete proposals makes our job much harder: remember that Program Committee members are volunteers.  

So, this year we’ll start to require more complete information on speakers as well as a single 200-word abstract. (No more information TBD!) In addition, sessions cannot be contingent on data or community case studies still to be performed. This year, all submissions will be vetted before the review process begins, and submissions deemed incomplete will be returned to the session proposer, who will have up to 72 hours to re-submit, at which point the deadline will be final and any proposals still incomplete will not be considered.  

We will, however, allow editing of submitted proposals before the Call closes on April 30. In addition, after acceptances are sent out in June, all requests for changes to sessions will have to be made via a Google Form, not by email. These requests will be reviewed within 48 hours by the Program Team.  

Speakers for accepted sessions will have until the end of June to confirm acceptance and until the end of August to join MCN and register for the conference (except for US government federal employees). We understand that your ability to register may be dependent on your institution’s funding, and that timing often fluctuates, but speakers not registered by that date will not be able to participate in the session.

But it’s not all about rules. We’re also serious about your professional development. “How Might We” also invited us to consider:

How might we help speakers become better teachers and also partners in the success of the conference?

Workshop presenters will be asked to indicate their previous experience level at teaching workshops, and will need to provide a detailed agenda. All accepted workshop presenters will be required to participate (sometime over the summer) in an online training session designed to refine your skills as a workshop leader. Remember, workshops are optional—they cost more for attendees to register and often require they spend an extra day at the conference. As such, MCN needs to ensure that workshops deliver the value and quality attendees should expect.

Look for ideas and teaching tips in the coming months for presenters in regular conference sessions as well. MCN will continue to support all our presenters between now and November.

All presenters for accepted sessions will be required to read and sign the Presenters Guidelines, which have been updated to reflect the changes mentioned in this post. Please read it carefully before you submit a proposal as it answers many questions you might have about the conference. Reading it closely may help you avoid panicked questions later! There will be a quiz and prizes!

A Word on the “Chatham House” Rule

All sessions during MCN’s annual conference areby defaultaudio-recorded, supported by an open social media policy. However, we understand that, in the interests of open dialogue, some session organizers might wish for anonymity. This year, you’ll have the option to check a box next to Chatham House rule to indicate that you prefer anonymity for your session. By capturing that preference in the submission process, MCN will also be able to indicate that preference in the online and printed program; later requests can be made using the Session Changes form. Session leaders will need to clearly let their attendees know, at the start of their session, just what this means.

So Get Your Proposals Ready … 

By making these changes to the call for proposals process, we wanted to address many of the issues and suggestions from the feedback you gave us on previous conferences. Ultimately, we hope you’ll find they translate into a better conference experience for all of us. The point, after all, is not only these three or four days in November, but the year-round contributions we all make to the field and the community of ideas and mission we all share. Please let us know your thoughts and your questions, on the submissions process or any topic at all, at any time by writing to program@mcn.edu. And we hope to see your proposals soon!

Your Program Team
Robert Weisberg, Catherine Devine, and Adrienne Lalli Hills, co-chairs

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MCN 2018: Humanizing the Digital

Star Trek the Next Generation GIF

Have you ever wondered how the MCN Program Committee chooses the conference theme? It’s often a messy but always a very thoughtful process.

In early February, as we started to contemplate possible directions for themes for this year’s conference, we (the Program Co-Chairs) invited Program Committee members to consider these questions:

  • How have current events and non-museum trends intersected with our work? Alternatively, how can they inform our work?
  • What are the big opportunities and challenges facing our community of practice?
  • What’s exciting in the world of museum tech and how could it transform your work?

The discussions quickly turned into an incisive analysis of our field, future, and wider cultural context. In a freewheeling thread of 60+ posts, we canvassed the Museums are Not Neutral movement, Net Neutrality, activism and resistance, and equity, accessibility, and inclusion. We asked how museums can establish public trust and foster meaningful discourse and personal connections in a time of discord and disinformation, and noted the ways in which we’ve recently seen the promise of technology flounder in biased algorithms, fake news, and the invective of online trolls and bots. At the same time, we celebrated the transformative power of digital tools and how essential they are to our everyday work as well as to our institutions’ respective missions.

In short, we found ourselves extolling the virtues of profoundly human qualitiesempathy, communication, creativity, and inquirywithin the context of planning for a museum technology conference. Wait… isn’t that a bit contradictory?

Lieutenant Commander Data GIF

Program Committee member Chad Weinard helped us see this through thereby coalescing the general thinking:

“… I’ve been working lately with digital humanities projects in academia, which empower humanities research with digital tools and mindsets (digitization, visual analysis, etc.). That’s great work, but I’m feeling over the past year that another, perhaps more urgent task, is the reverse … making technology culture more human. Museums may have a role both in digitizing humanities and humanizing the digital.

Hence, Humanizing the Digital was born. Because we recognize the diversity of professional disciplines within the MCN community, we wanted to make sure that this year’s theme could kindle vibrant dialogue among all circles, from IT to interpretive media. In fact, we intentionally tested that further by asking Program Committee members to “try on” the theme as a way to generate ideas for would-be sessions to gauge alignment with the theme. For reference, here are a few examples of what sessions could focus on: 

  • Digital leadership and strategy
  • Ethical responsibilities of museums in the digital age
  • Public communication and advocacy
  • Using technology to build empathy, foster dialogue, and inspire positive change
  • Hands-on and participatory solutions to specific museum technology problems

But wait a minute: wasn’t the MCN 2016 theme The Human-Centered Museum? Indeed it was, and it does share a similar focus with Humanizing the Digital. But we’re hoping for 2018 to be a continuation of the rich discourse that blossomed in New Orleans. In addition, we also believe that Humanizing the Digital takes on new dimension, and a gravitas of it own, in light of the profound social and cultural changes that we’ve witnessed over the past few years.

We look forward to seeing the proposals for workshops, sessions, or talks that Humanizing the Digital will inspire you to submit, as well as the ensuing conversations—both online and IRL. Stay tuned for upcoming updates on the conference keynote speaker, and the call for proposals, which will be live April 1-30.

Lieutenant Commander Data GIF

 

 

 

 

 

In parting, we invite you to look to Lieutenant Commander Data from Star Trek: The Next Generation, for inspiration:  

If being human is not simply a matter of being born flesh and blood, if it’s simply a way of thinking, acting, and feeling, then I am hopeful that one day I will discover my own humanity. Until then, I will continue learning, changing, growing, and trying to become more than what I am.

 

-Adrienne Lalli Hills, Rob Weisberg, and Catherine Devine

MCN 2018 Conference Program Co-Chairs

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MCN 2018 Program Committee – Call for Program Committee Members

Time flies and before you know it we’ll all be in Denver for MCN2018. If you’ve always thought you’d love to contribute to the planning of the conference then this is your opportunity and we’d love to hear from you.

The MCN2018 Program Committee is seeking about 40 museum professionals to play a significant role in shaping this year’s conference, representing a diversity of institutions, perspectives, and skills. This committee will help shape this year’s conference which is being held Nov. 13-16 in Denver.

What does the Program Committee do?

Through online discussions, the Program Committee is a think tank that determines the most important themes and trends in the field, identifies new programming opportunities, and brainstorms possible speakers. Most significantly, members are the backbone of the conference proposal evaluation process. (But don’t worry—participating in the committee will not preclude you from submitting your own proposal!)

In February, the Program Committee will discuss and choose a theme for this year’s conference; soon after, the committee will identify possible keynote speakers.

In May, after the close of MCN’s Call for Proposals, individual session proposals are assigned for evaluation to Program Committee members with relevant professional expertise on the topic. Members are asked to provide feedback through a formalized process and are given 10-14 days to complete their evaluations. Next, the Program Co-Chairs assemble the conference schedule primarily based on the committee’s feedback.

If you have expertise in any of the following areas we are particularly interested.

  • Digital Education
  • Interpretive Media
  • Research and Evaluation
  • Informational Technology (IT)
  • Digital Asset Management (DAM)
  • Social Media
  • Marketing and Communications
  • Media Production & Branding
  • Leadership & Strategy
  • Data and Insights
  • Digital Imaging
  • Intellectual Property
  • Publishing
  • Experience Design
  • Digital Storytelling

We are actively seeking a diversity of organizations in both size and focus including, but not limited to:

  • Science Museums, Zoos, and/or Aquariums
  • Art Museums and Centers
  • Natural History Museums
  • Historic Houses
  • Libraries
  • Archives  

including small, international and academic institutions.

If you are interested please submit details of your interest on the following online form. Have a question we didn’t answer here? Email the Program Co-Chairs at program@mcn.edu.

Deadline: Saturday, January 27th, 2018

-Adrienne Lalli Hills, Rob Weisberg, and Catherine Devine

MCN 2018 Program Co-Chairs

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Welcome our new Program co-chairs

Hello, MCN community!


Robert Weisberg, Program Chair, here, and I’m thrilled to announce your two new co-chairs for MCN in 2018 and 2019—Adrienne Lalli Hills, Manager, Digital Learning, at the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art in Kansas City, Missouri, and Catherine Devine, Chief Digital Officer at the American Museum of Natural History in New York. They’re joining me and the MCN leadership team which is already planning MCN2018 in Denver in just under 10 months!

Thank you to everyone who applied and everyone else in the community who took interest in the application call through social media. We want to repay and make good on this enthusiasm by bringing you a constantly-improving and -evolving conference this year and in the future. Stay tuned for more news about and opportunities to participate in MCN.

So please welcome your new co-chairs, joining me on the Program Team.

Robert Weisberg
MCN Program Chair

Adrienne Lalli Hills

Hi, I’m Adrienne! I’m a native of Tulsa, Oklahoma presently living in Kansas City, Missouri. I’m passionate about lifelong learning in museums and informal education settings. I love the MCN community and look forward to serving as a program co-chair for the 2018-19 conferences.

As Manager, Digital Learning at the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art, I collaborate with IT, design, education, and curatorial colleagues to create in-gallery, mobile, and web-based visitor experiences. Over the last 10 years, I’ve worked as an interpretive planner, program specialist, and teaching artist at art, science, and children’s museums.

When I’m not thinking about museums, I’m singing karaoke, reading science non-fiction, playing with my toddler, and keeping my 1920s-era bungalow shipshape.

 

Catherine Devine

I’m currently the Chief Digital Officer at the American Museum of Natural History in New York. I’m originally Australian, having spent the past 19 years in the United States after migrating to the US at the time of the first dotcom boom in 1999. I’ve held the CDO role for 6 years and spend my days thinking about existing and emerging digital technologies, how they can be leveraged to work with the Museum experience inside and outside of the museum to create an authentic Museum experience. I believe strongly that digital is a transformative technology that adds to the experience.

My current role in Museums builds on a 30-year career in technology and digital strategy and delivery across a variety of industries including finance, internet, e-commerce and consulting. Some notable clients and employers have included America Online, Ralph Lauren, Estee Lauder, PBS, Avaya, and JetBlue.

 

 

 

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Looking for MCN 2018 Program co-chairs!

Hello, MCNers!

I hope everyone has had the opportunity to Look Back at a great MCN 2017 and 50 years of MCN history in the amazing MCN50 Voices series of interviews, Take Action at their institutions and in their communities, and … Think Ahead about MCN 2018.

The past year has been such an amazing experience as one of the Program Co-Chairs, along with Jennifer Foley and Trish Oxford. With Jennifer and Trish stepping down after their two-year terms have concluded, MCN is looking for two people to take their place and, with me, help plan our annual conference in 2018, then taking the lead for 2019.

It’s a lot of work, but you’ll be part of a sizable leadership and management team of MCN colleagues, as well as a field full of people who want to speak at, attend, and contribute to MCN 2018.

Here are 10 highlights of my first year as Co-Chair:

  1. Finding out just how much I already knew about the museum field—and how much there still is to learn.
  2. Working with the committee of local museum technology professionals in our host city and finding out the amazing work being done there.
  3. Crafting the theme, which starts pretty much right away and gets the Program Committee off to a rollicking start.
  4. Developing Keynote speaker(s) ideas, also with the Program Committee. This year we had some innovative ideas and it was great to see them realized.
  5. Calling for proposals in the spring—watching them trickle and then pour in, sending them out to the Program Committee for review, and then working together, with the help of a few hundred sticky notes, to turn them into a program.
  6. The weekly Co-Chair conference call.
  7. The conference itself, of course, which is a very different experience when you see it come together rather than just presenting.
  8. And yet presenting was still a joy.
  9. Developing the “other format” idea and receiving over two dozen proposals beyond the usual case studies, panels, and presentations.
  10. My favorite—being able to say to people, “You should really propose that as a session!”

The official call for Co-Chair applications is below. Applications are due to program@mcn.edu by December 22 January 7 (now extended!); I’m happy to answer any and all questions. Thanks,

Rob Weisberg
MCN 2018 Conference Program Chair

Trish Oxford, MCN2017 Program Co-Chair

MCN Program Co-Chair 2018 & 2019
Position Title: Conference Program Co-Chair

Period: 2 years
Start: late January 2018

Commitment: 3-5 hours/week throughout the year, increasing as the conference nears, with milestones in May and September, available full-time during the conference. Available one weekend in late March or early April for a site visit to that year’s conference location (paid for by MCN).

Compensation: the Conference Program Co-Chair is a volunteer role and is therefore not compensated; however, MCN does offer complimentary registration to the annual conference during the year(s) you serve.

Location: MCN’s Annual Conference is a North American based-conference that supports global involvement and has an emerging international following. The successful candidate is required to attend the Conference in person, as well as participate in regular phone or online meetings.

MCN2018 will take place in Denver, November 13–16, 2018, when the location of MCN2019 will be announced.

Deadline for applying: Extended until end of day, January 7!

Description: MCN is looking for two thoughtful, motivated, and dynamic museum professionals to serve as MCN Conference Program Co-Chairs for a two-year term starting in January 2018. This is an opportunity to help shape a major museum technology conference now and in future years, immerse yourself in cutting edge developments in the sector, broaden your networks on a national level, and to gain experience and professional development in event programming.

The Conference Program Co-Chairs provide leadership for the annual MCN Conference, creating the program through the conception and organization of workshops, panels and presentations in many different formats, experimental programs, keynotes, special events, and innovations not yet imagined. With current Conference Program Chair Rob Weisberg, the newly appointed Conference Program Co-Chairs will work as a team to develop an experiential conference program that serves the evolving needs of the MCN community and then serve as lead Conference Program Co-Chairs for the 2019 conference.

The ideal candidate will be passionate about the intersection of museums and technology and interested in developing an innovative conference program featuring proposals from participants from a wide range of institutions, backgrounds, and perspectives. They will be knowledgeable about MCN and the conference, having attended MCN several times in the previous five years. They will have existing networks within the sector, a strong understanding of the issues confronting museums with regards to technology and the practice of digital, and appreciate the challenges facing their colleagues from many different kinds of institutions and departments in the field. They will be active in the museum or cultural technology community and knowledgeable of trusted sources of information, and will be a proactive self-starter and a calm problem-solver with excellent oral and written communication skills. They will be a creative thinker both about big issues and small details, diplomatic under pressure, and ready to learn and adapt over the course of planning this conference.

About MCN: MCN is a nonprofit organization whose core purpose is to foster innovation and excellence by supporting professionals who seek to transform the way their cultural organizations reach, engage, and educate their audiences using digital technologies. We do this by building a community that attracts, nurtures, inspires and sustains exceptional professionals. Learn more.

For further information and a full overview of responsibilities, email program@mcn.edu.

To apply, please send an email articulating why you think you’d be a good fit for this position, and noting any relevant experience to: program@mcn.edu. Please include a CV or link to your LinkedIn profile.

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“Other” Category Unpacked: #MCN2017 Call for Proposals

A group of MCN conference attendees meet on the floor at MCN 2016

Some of the best things in #musetech start in a floor meeting at MCN conferences

 

As a candid and welcoming community, MCN has always championed innovative sessions that are willing to take risks. Last year through the “Other” Category in the Call for Proposals, the program co-chairs created the option for attendees to “propose something else” to present in New Orleans. We actively sought out, encouraged and cultivated potential session ideas that did not fit the traditional 15-minute case study, 30-minute talk, or 60-minute multi-speaker panel formats. The resulting sessions were some of the highlights from #MCN2016 in New Orleans.

We hosted a number of “Unconferences” such as Rob Weisberg’s “‘Views My Own’ Museblog Unconference” and Greg Albers and Annelisa Stephan’s “Making the Workplace You Want.” The Unconference format is a loose and informal discussion usually focusing on a particular topic, sometimes over lunch.

Another kind of alternative session is the Teach-In. Last year in New Orleans, Nikhil Trivedi organized a “Github” offshoot meeting for people interested in the basics workings of Github. Teach-Ins, much like unconferences, are informal discussions focused on knowledge or skill-sharing.

We also hosted sessions with game formats like Trish Oxford’s Power of Vulnerability in Museums session, in which a panel of 5 individuals answered probing questions about museum work culture that were chosen at random for 60 minutes.

We have hosted live podcast session’s like Chad Weinard and Jason Alderman’s The Future of Museum Technology that “took a breakneck look at the problems in dealing with legacy systems, the failings of collection management systems, the infrastructure of process, and the importance of collaboration.”

Many sessions were held under Chatham House Rule, which specifies that participants are free to use the information received, but neither the identity nor the affiliation of the speaker(s), nor that of any other participant, may be revealed on social media channels or other broadcasts. These sessions became a safe place, in which participants were not recorded and could speak freely.

These few examples have in common informality, interactivity, and group exploration of topics that warrant discussion and dialogue. Other ideas might include:

  • A series of grouped short ignite talks, similar to the popular opening-night event
  • Round tables with more interaction than a typical multi-speaker panel
  • Group affinity discussions
  • Hackathons and prototyping

However, this doesn’t preclude you from adding audience participation and interactivity to more typical presentation formats. Many kinds of longer presentations—such as hackathons and prototyping—with interactivity and learning opportunities can be proposed as a pre-conference workshop. And the 60-minute panel timeframe affords much potential for audience interaction and elements of workshopping. No matter which type of format you propose, think of ways to keep the audience involved!

This year, we are also interested in sessions/activities that will enrich the program and conference experience including but not limited to open yoga sessions, running groups, museum pillow talk, drum circles, and silent discos. Please consider space limitations/requirements, extra equipment and costs when proposing these sessions.

In the end all great “Other” sessions begin with an idea or concept a group wants to explore, no matter how mundane or taboo it may seem. The MCN co-chairs are more than willing to talk through your proposal ideas and help devise the best session format to explore.

#MCN2017’s Call for Proposals opens April 1st!  

Don’t hesitate to reach out to program@mcn.edu with your questions, comments, and ideas.

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Welcome our new conference co-chair, Rob Weisberg!

Post by Program co-chair, Trish Oxford

 

Jennifer Foley and I are excited to announce that Rob Weisberg will be our newest Program Co-Chair for #MCN2017! This year, in addition to developing the conference theme, call for proposals, program structure, and creative events, the Program Committee will also ensure that MCN’s 50th anniversary gets recognized and celebrated in Pittsburgh during MCN2017 itself. Our Co-Chairs will explore how MCN has impacted our community over the past 50 years and how we will carry on this spirit of innovation into the future! Rob comes to the team with a wealth of ideas, energy, and enthusiasm.  Please join me in welcoming him to the team! If you haven’t yet been in touch, but are interested in helping shape the future of the annual conference, we’d love to hear from you. All ideas are welcome. Please write to program@mcn.edu

Meet Rob, MCN2017 Program Co-Chair

Robert Weisberg headshotRob is Senior Project Manager in the Publications and Editorial Department at The Metropolitan Museum of Art. His experience before The Met was in journalism and publishing production, so he appreciates the many paths people take before ending up in the museum field. Rob worked on hundreds of Met printed exhibition and collection catalogues until the past few years when he helped reboot the museum’s label program, as well as participated in several print-digital hybrid projects. He’s always tried to mediate and translate between different museum and workplace cultures and styles; he considers discrediting false dichotomies in the museum field — visitor-focused or collection-focused, print or digital, slow or fast, creative or organized, agile or deliberative — to be his calling. He blogs about museums and organizational culture at robertjweisberg.com. Rob has been a temporary New Yorker for 25 years and lives in New York City with his real-New-Yorker wife.

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#MCN2017 Program Committee: We Want You!

A panorama shot of MCN 2016 Ignite at the House of Blues, New Orleans

At your institution…

Do you design beautiful digital publications or geek out on microcontrollers and circuits? We want you.

Do you get your kicks from collaborating through interpretive media or crunching data to inform your museum’s digital strategy? We want you.

Do you work in a department 2 or 200? We want you.

The MCN2017 Program Committee is seeking 40 museum professionals, each bringing a different perspective from across the sector.  This committee will play a significant role shaping this year’s conference Nov. 7-10 in Pittsburgh.

 

What does the Program Committee do?

Through online discussions, the Program Committee is a think tank that determines the most important themes and trends in the field, identifies new programming opportunities, and brainstorms possible speakers. Most significantly, members are the backbone of the conference proposal evaluation process.

In May, after the close of MCN’s Call for Proposals, individual proposals are assigned for evaluation to Program Committee members with relevant professional expertise on the topic. Evaluators are asked to provide feedback through a formalized process. Members are given 10-14 days to complete their evaluations. Next, the Program Co-Chairs assemble the conference schedule primarily based on the committee’s feedback.    

This year is a special year for MCN! #MCN50
In Pittsburgh, MCN2017 will celebrate MCN’s 50th anniversary! Honoring the organization’s work to advance digital transformation in museums, our “Dream Team” Program Committee will represent as many as possible of the following expertise:

  • Digital Education
  • Interpretive Media
  • Research and Evaluation
  • Informational Technology (IT)
  • Digital Asset Management (DAM)
  • Social Media
  • Marketing and Communications
  • Media Production & Branding
  • Leadership & Strategy
  • Data and Insights
  • Digital Imaging
  • Intellectual Property
  • Publishing
  • Experience Design
  • Digital Storytelling

We are actively seeking a diversity of organizations including, but not limited to:

  • Science Museums, Zoos, and/or Aquariums
  • Art Museums and Centers
  • Natural History Museums
  • Historic Houses
  • Libraries
  • Archives  

We are also looking to include representation of small, international, and academic institutions.

If you are interested in helping us rock Pittsburgh, send an email to program@mcn.edu describing your interest. Please include a link to your LinkedIn profile or resume/CV attached.

Deadline: Tuesday, January 31st

-Trish Oxford & Jennifer Foley

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Call for MCN Program Co-Chair 2017 & 2018

Post it notes with MCN 2016 session proposals written on them.

MCN Program Co-Chair 2017 & 2018

Position Title: Program Co-Chair

Period: 2 years

Start: Mid-December 2016

Commitment: 2-5 hours/week throughout the year, increasing as the conference nears; full time during the conference. Available one weekend in February/March for a site visit to that year’s conference location (paid for by MCN).

Compensation: Program Co-Chair is a volunteer role and is therefore not compensated. MCN does however offer complimentary registration to the annual conference during the year(s) you serve.

Location: MCN’s Annual Conference is a North American based-conference that supports global involvement and has an emerging international following. The successful candidate is required to attend the Conference in person, as well as participate in regular phone or online meetings.
MCN2017 will take place in Pittsburgh, November 7–10, 2017.

Deadline: January 15th

 

Description

MCN is looking for one thoughtful, motivated and dynamic museum professionals to join us as MCN Program Co-Chair. This is an opportunity to help shape the future of a major museum technology conference, immerse yourself in cutting edge developments in the sector, broaden your networks on a national level, and to gain experience and professional development in event programming.

The Program Co-Chair provides leadership for the annual MCN Conference, creating the program through the conception and organization of panels, presentations, paper sessions, readings, performances, exhibitions, installations, workshops, and special events. With current Co-Chairs Jennifer Foley and Trish Oxford, the newly appointed Co-Chair will work together to develop an innovative and experiential conference program that serves the evolving needs of the MCN community as it celebrates its 50th anniversary in 2017, and then assume the lead Co-Chair role for the 2018 conference.

The ideal candidate will be passionate about the intersection of museums and technology, and interested in developing an innovative conference program, ideally having attended MCN at least twice in the previous five years, and with one of those years being 2016 (preferred) or 2015. They will have existing networks within the sector, and a strong understanding of the issues facing museums with regards to technology. They will be active in the museum or cultural technology community (museums, archives, libraries, etc.) and knowledgeable of trusted sources of information; a proactive self-starter; have excellent oral and written communication skills; be a creative, big thinker; and be diplomatic under pressure.

About MCN
MCN is a nonprofit organization whose core purpose is to foster innovation and excellence by supporting professionals who seek to transform the way their cultural organizations reach, engage, and educate their audiences using digital technologies. We do this by building a community that attracts, nurtures, inspires and sustains exceptional professionals. Learn more.

For further information and a full overview of responsibilities, email program@mcn.edu.

To apply, please send an email articulating why you think you’d be a good fit for this position, and noting any relevant experience to: jobs@mcn.edu. Please include a CV or link to your LinkedIn profile.

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